Beyond Cannery Row

Beyond Cannery Row
Author: Carol Lynn McKibben
Publsiher: University of Illinois Press
Total Pages: 159
Release: 2006-01
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780252030581

Download Beyond Cannery Row Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Presenting a nuanced story of women, migration, community, industry, and civic life at the turn of the twentieth century, Carol Lynn McKibben's Beyond Cannery Row analyzes the processes of migration and settlement of Sicilian fishers from three villages in Western Sicily to Monterey, California--and sometimes back again. McKibben's analysis of gender and gender roles shows that it was the women in this community who had the insight, the power, and the purpose to respond and even prosper amid changing economic conditions. Vividly evoking the immigrants' everyday experiences through first-person accounts and detailed description, McKibben demonstrates that the cannery work done by Sicilian immigrant women was crucial in terms of the identity formation and community development. These changes allowed their families to survive the challenges of political conflicts over citizenship in World War II and intermarriage with outsiders throughout the migration experience. The women formed voluntary associations and celebrated festas that effectively linked them with each other and with their home villages in Sicily. Continuous migration created a strong sense of transnationalism among Sicilians in Monterey, which has enabled them to continue as a viable ethnic community today.

Beyond Cannery Row

Beyond Cannery Row
Author: Carol Lynn McKibben
Publsiher: University of Illinois Press
Total Pages: 184
Release: 2010-10-01
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9780252091902

Download Beyond Cannery Row Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Presenting a nuanced story of women, migration, community, industry, and civic life at the turn of the twentieth century, Carol Lynn McKibben's Beyond Cannery Row analyzes the processes of migration and settlement of Sicilian fishers from three villages in Western Sicily to Monterey, California--and sometimes back again. McKibben's analysis of gender and gender roles shows that it was the women in this community who had the insight, the power, and the purpose to respond and even prosper amid changing economic conditions. Vividly evoking the immigrants' everyday experiences through first-person accounts and detailed description, McKibben demonstrates that the cannery work done by Sicilian immigrant women was crucial in terms of the identity formation and community development. These changes allowed their families to survive the challenges of political conflicts over citizenship in World War II and intermarriage with outsiders throughout the migration experience. The women formed voluntary associations and celebrated festas that effectively linked them with each other and with their home villages in Sicily. Continuous migration created a strong sense of transnationalism among Sicilians in Monterey, which has enabled them to continue as a viable ethnic community today.

Cannery Row

Cannery Row
Author: John Steinbeck
Publsiher: McClelland & Stewart
Total Pages: 181
Release: 2020-02-11
Genre: Fiction
ISBN: 9780735254312

Download Cannery Row Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

In this tough yet charming portrait of people on the margins of society, Steinbeck focuses on the acceptance of life as it is—both the exuberance of community and the loneliness of the individual. Drawing on his memories of friends in Monterey, California, he interweaves the stories of Lee, Doc, and Mack, the inhabitants of Cannery Row. What results is a procession of linked vignettes and a novel that is at once Steinbeck’s most humorous and poignant works, filled with human warmth, camaraderie, and love. Penguin Random House Canada is proud to bring you classic works of literature in e-book form, with the highest quality production values. Find more today and rediscover books you never knew you loved.

Cannery Row

Cannery Row
Author: John Steinbeck
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 196
Release: 1992
Genre: Fiction
ISBN: 0140177388

Download Cannery Row Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Vividly depicts the colorful, sometimes disreputable, inhabitants of a run-down area in Monterey, California

Beyond the Outer Shores

Beyond the Outer Shores
Author: Eric Enno Tamm
Publsiher: Raincoast Books
Total Pages: 365
Release: 2004
Genre: Coastal ecology
ISBN: 1551927330

Download Beyond the Outer Shores Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Racial Beachhead

Racial Beachhead
Author: Carol Lynn McKibben
Publsiher: Stanford University Press
Total Pages: 352
Release: 2011-11-23
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780804778442

Download Racial Beachhead Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

In 1917, Fort Ord was established in the tiny subdivision of Seaside, California. Over the course of the 20th century, it held great national and military importance—a major launching point for World War II operations, the first base in the military to undergo complete integration, the West Coast's most important training base for draftees in the Vietnam War, a site of important civil rights movements—until its closure in the 1990s. Alongside it, the city of Seaside took form. Racial Beachhead offers the story of this city, shaped over the decades by military policies of racial integration in the context of the ideals of the American civil rights movement. Middle class blacks, together with other military families—black, white, Hispanic, and Asian—created a local politics of inclusion that continues to serve as a reminder that integration can work to change ideas about race. Though Seaside's relationship with the military makes it unique, at the same time the story of Seaside is part and parcel of the story of 20th century American town life. Its story contributes to the growing history of cities of color—those minority-majority places that are increasingly the face of urban America.

Tortilla Flat

Tortilla Flat
Author: John Steinbeck
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 207
Release: 1986
Genre: Fiction
ISBN: 0140042407

Download Tortilla Flat Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Danny, a mule skinner during the First World War, returns to Tortilla Flat to enjoy the carefree and amoral life of the paisano

Shaping the Shoreline

Shaping the Shoreline
Author: Connie Y. Chiang
Publsiher: University of Washington Press
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2009-11-17
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780295989778

Download Shaping the Shoreline Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

The Monterey coast, home to an acclaimed aquarium and the setting for John Steinbeck's classic novel Cannery Row, was also the stage for a historical junction of industry and tourism. Shaping the Shoreline looks at the ways in which Monterey has formed, and been formed by, the tension between labor and leisure. Connie Y. Chiang examines Monterey's development from a seaside resort into a working-class fishing town and, finally, into a tourist attraction again. Through the subjects of work, recreation, and environment -- the intersections of which are applicable to communities across the United States and abroad -- she documents the struggles and contests over this magnificent coastal region. By tracing Monterey's shift from what was once the literal Cannery Row to an iconic hub that now houses an aquarium in which nature is replicated to attract tourists, the interactions of people with nature continues to change. Drawing on histories of immigration, unionization, and the impact of national and international events, Chiang explores the reciprocal relationship between social and environmental change. By integrating topics such as race, ethnicity, and class into environmental history, Chiang illustrates the idea that work and play are not mutually exclusive endeavors.

Good Girls Don t Wear Trousers

Good Girls Don t Wear Trousers
Author: Lara Cardella
Publsiher: Arcade Publishing
Total Pages: 118
Release: 1994
Genre: Fiction
ISBN: 155970263X

Download Good Girls Don t Wear Trousers Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

An international bestseller chronicles the adventures of twelve-year-old Annetta, desperate to get away from her stifling Sicilian village, who is sent away to live with grim relatives, where a shocking truth about her childhood is revealed.

Breaking Through

Breaking Through
Author: Edward Flanders Ricketts
Publsiher: Univ of California Press
Total Pages: 348
Release: 2006
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780520247048

Download Breaking Through Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Trailblazing marine biologist, visionary conservationist, deep ecology philosopher, Edward F. Ricketts (1897?1948) has reached legendary status in the California mythos. A true polymath and a thinker ahead of his time, Ricketts was a scientist who worked in passionate collaboration with many of his friends?artists, writers, and influential intellectual figures?including, perhaps most famously, John Steinbeck, who once said that Ricketts's mind ?had no horizons.” This unprecedented collection, featuring previously unpublished pieces as well as others available for the first time in their original form, reflects the wide scope of Ricketts's scientific, philosophical, and literary interests during the years he lived and worked on Cannery Row in Monterey, California. These writings, which together illuminate the evolution of Ricketts's unique, holistic approach to science, include ?Verbatim transcription of notes on the Gulf of California trip,” the basic manuscript for Steinbeck's and Ricketts's Log from the Sea of Cortez; the essays ?The Philosophy of Breaking Through” and ?A Spiritual Morphology of Poetry;” several shorter pieces on topics including collecting invertebrates and the impact of modernization on Mexican village life; and more. An engaging critical biography and a number of rare photographs offer a new and richly detailed view of Ricketts's life.

Philosophy in the American West

Philosophy in the American West
Author: Josh Hayes,Gerard Kuperus,Brian Treanor
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 202
Release: 2020-07-21
Genre: Nature
ISBN: 9781000092417

Download Philosophy in the American West Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Philosophy in the American West explores the physical, ecological, cultural, and narrative environments associated with the western United States, reflecting on the relationship between people and the places that sustain them. The American West has long been recognized as having significance. From Crèvecoeur’s early observations in Letters from an American Farmer (1782), to Thoreau’s reflections in Walden (1854), to twentieth-century thoughts on the legacy of a vanishing frontier, "the West" has played a pivotal role in the American narrative and in the American sense of self. But while the nature of "westernness" has been touched on by historians, sociologists, and, especially, novelists and poets, this collection represents the first attempt to think philosophically about the nature of "the West" and its influence on us. The contributors take up thinkers that have been associated with Continental Philosophy and pair them with writers, poets, and artists of "the West". And while this collection seeks to loosen the cords that tie philosophy to Europe, the traditions of "continental" philosophy—phenomenology, hermeneutics, deconstruction, and others—offer deep resources for thinking through the particularity of place. This book will be of great interest to students and scholars of Philosophy, as well as those working in Ecocriticism and the Environmental Humanities more broadly.

Beyond Boundaries

Beyond Boundaries
Author: Susan Shillinglaw,Kevin Hearle
Publsiher: University of Alabama Press
Total Pages: 362
Release: 2002-08-21
Genre: Literary Criticism
ISBN: 9780817311513

Download Beyond Boundaries Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Documents life among the Kayapo Indians of central Brazil, a fiercely independent tribe, who were forced to become "businessmen" or see their traditional way of life destroyed.

The Grapes of Wrath

The Grapes of Wrath
Author: John Steinbeck
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 528
Release: 2006-03-28
Genre: Fiction
ISBN: 0143039431

Download The Grapes of Wrath Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

The Pulitzer Prize-winning epic of the Great Depression, a book that galvanized—and sometimes outraged—millions of readers. Nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read A Penguin Classic First published in 1939, Steinbeck’s Pulitzer Prize-winning epic of the Great Depression chronicles the Dust Bowl migration of the 1930s and tells the story of one Oklahoma farm family, the Joads—driven from their homestead and forced to travel west to the promised land of California. Out of their trials and their repeated collisions against the hard realities of an America divided into Haves and Have-Nots evolves a drama that is intensely human yet majestic in its scale and moral vision, elemental yet plainspoken, tragic but ultimately stirring in its human dignity. A portrait of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless, of one man’s fierce reaction to injustice, and of one woman’s stoical strength, the novel captures the horrors of the Great Depression and probes into the very nature of equality and justice in America. At once a naturalistic epic, captivity narrative, road novel, and transcendental gospel, Steinbeck’s powerful landmark novel is perhaps the most American of American Classics. This Penguin Classics edition contains an introduction and notes by Steinbeck scholar Robert Demott. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,800 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

The Winter of Our Discontent

The Winter of Our Discontent
Author: John Steinbeck
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 336
Release: 2008-08-26
Genre: Fiction
ISBN: 0143039482

Download The Winter of Our Discontent Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

The final novel of one of America’s most beloved writers—a tale of degeneration, corruption, and spiritual crisis A Penguin Classic In awarding John Steinbeck the 1962 Nobel Prize in Literature, the Nobel committee stated that with The Winter of Our Discontent, he had “resumed his position as an independent expounder of the truth, with an unbiased instinct for what is genuinely American.” Ethan Allen Hawley, the protagonist of Steinbeck’s last novel, works as a clerk in a grocery store that his family once owned. With Ethan no longer a member of Long Island’s aristocratic class, his wife is restless, and his teenage children are hungry for the tantalizing material comforts he cannot provide. Then one day, in a moment of moral crisis, Ethan decides to take a holiday from his own scrupulous standards. Set in Steinbeck’s contemporary 1960 America, the novel explores the tenuous line between private and public honesty, and today ranks alongside his most acclaimed works of penetrating insight into the American condition. This Penguin Classics edition features an introduction and notes by leading Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

The Short Novels of John Steinbeck

The Short Novels of John Steinbeck
Author: John Steinbeck
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 624
Release: 2009-07-08
Genre: Fiction
ISBN: 9781101138878

Download The Short Novels of John Steinbeck Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

A Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition of Steinbeck's brilliant short novels Collected here for the first time in a deluxe paperback volume are six of John Steinbeck's most widely read and beloved novels. From the tale of commitment, loneliness and hope in Of Mice and Men, to the tough yet charming portrait of people on the margins of society in Cannery Row, to The Pearl's examination of the fallacy of the American dream, Steinbeck stories of realism, that were imbued with energy and resilience. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.