Citizens of London

Citizens of London
Author: Lynne Olson
Publsiher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
Total Pages: 496
Release: 2011-05-03
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780812979350

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The acclaimed author of Troublesome Young Men reveals the behind-the-scenes story of how the United States forged its wartime alliance with Britain, told from the perspective of three key American players in London: Edward R. Murrow, the handsome, chain-smoking head of CBS News in Europe; Averell Harriman, the hard-driving millionaire who ran FDR’s Lend-Lease program in London; and John Gilbert Winant, the shy, idealistic U.S. ambassador to Britain. Each man formed close ties with Winston Churchill—so much so that all became romantically involved with members of the prime minister’s family. Drawing from a variety of primary sources, Lynne Olson skillfully depicts the dramatic personal journeys of these men who, determined to save Britain from Hitler, helped convince a cautious Franklin Roosevelt and reluctant American public to back the British at a critical time. Deeply human, brilliantly researched, and beautifully written, Citizens of London is a new triumph from an author swiftly becoming one of the finest in her field.

Citizens of London

Citizens of London
Author: Lynne Olson
Publsiher: Random House
Total Pages: 496
Release: 2010-02-02
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781588369826

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“Engaging and original, rich in anecdote and analysis, this is a terrific work of history.”—Jon Meacham, Pulitzer Prize–winning author of American Lion The acclaimed author of Troublesome Young Men reveals the behind-the-scenes story of how the United States forged its wartime alliance with Britain, told from the perspective of three key American players in London: Edward R. Murrow, the handsome, chain-smoking head of CBS News in Europe; Averell Harriman, the hard-driving millionaire who ran FDR’s Lend-Lease program in London; and John Gilbert Winant, the shy, idealistic U.S. ambassador to Britain. Each man formed close ties with Winston Churchill—so much so that all became romantically involved with members of the prime minister’s family. Drawing from a variety of primary sources, Lynne Olson skillfully depicts the dramatic personal journeys of these men who, determined to save Britain from Hitler, helped convince a cautious Franklin Roosevelt and reluctant American public to back the British at a critical time. Deeply human, brilliantly researched, and beautifully written, Citizens of London is a new triumph from an author swiftly becoming one of the finest in her field. Praise for Citizens of London “Brilliantly bursting with beautiful prose, Olson flutters our hearts by capturing the essence of the public and private lives of those who faced death, touched the precipice, hung on by their eyelids, and saved the free world from destruction by the forces of evil.”—Bill Gardner, New Hampshire Secretary of State “If you don't think there's any more to learn about the power struggles, rivalries and dramas—both personal and political—about the US-British aliance in the World War II years, this book will change your mind—and keep you turning the pages as well.”—Jeff Greenfield, Senior Political Correspondent, CBS News “Three fascinating Americans living in London helped cement the World War II alliance between Roosevelt and Churchill. Lynne Olson brings us the wonderful saga of Harriman, Murrow, and Winant. A triumph of research and storytelling, Citizens of London is history on an intimate level.”—Walter Isaacson, author of Einstein

Citizens of London

Citizens of London
Author: Lynne Olson
Publsiher: Scribe Publications
Total Pages: 496
Release: 2015-05-02
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781925113891

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An enthralling, behind-the-scenes account of how the United States forged its wartime alliance with Britain. Citizens of London brings out of history’s shadows the three key American players in London: Edward R. Murrow, the handsome, chain-smoking news reporter; Averell Harriman, the hard-driving millionaire who ran FDR’s Lend-Lease programme in London; and John G. Winant, the shy, idealistic US ambassador. Citizens of London examines how these men fought to save Britain in its darkest hour. Each formed close ties with Winston Churchill — so much so that all became romantically involved with members of the prime minister’s family. Drawing on a variety of primary sources, Lynne Olson skilfully depicts the dramatic personal journeys of these men who, determined to save Britain from Hitler, helped convince a cautious FDR and reluctant American public to back the British at a critical time. Deeply human, brilliantly researched, and beautifully written, Citizens of London is a triumph. PRAISE FOR LYNNE OLSON ‘A nuanced history that captures the immense amount of material on the period and crafts a cracking good read.’ The New York Post ‘Magnificent, beautifully written … This is gripping, page-turning history, with the future of the free world hanging in the balance, dangerous liaisons and broken hearts behind the public jubilation.’ The Courier Mail

Citizens of London

Citizens of London
Author: Lynne Olson
Publsiher: Anchor Canada
Total Pages: 496
Release: 2011-05-03
Genre: Alliances
ISBN: 0385669399

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The behind-the-scenes story of how the United States forged its wartime alliance with Britain, told from the perspective of three key American players in London: Edward R. Murrow, Averell Harriman, and John Gilbert Winant.

Citizens of the World

Citizens of the World
Author: David Hancock
Publsiher: Cambridge University Press
Total Pages: 477
Release: 1997-09-13
Genre: Business & Economics
ISBN: 052162942X

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Examines the business and social strategies of the men who developed the British empire in the eighteenth century.

The Crisis of London

The Crisis of London
Author: Andy Thornley
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 232
Release: 2003-09-02
Genre: Architecture
ISBN: 9781134915149

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London is in a mess. This is evident from the increasingly unpleasant experience of daily life in the capital, from homelessness and unemployment to frustrating transport facilities and the general bad quality of the environment. However it is not only citizens of London who are suffering but the business community as well. London is having to face increasing competition from other European cities. There is growing appreciation and debate about these problems from companies, political parties, local government and community organisations. The Crisis of London provides a solid analysis of what has gone wrong and explores policy directions that could make the city a more humane and livable place. Beginning with a discussion of the basic elements of a home, a job and a means of travelling around, it becomes clear that even in these essential aspects London is failing. A feature of the crisis is an increasingly divided city with conditions for the poorer citizens worsening all the time. The authors consider the quality of the environment. They examine the greening of the city and the need for sustainability, the privatisation and dehumanisation of public spaces; the fear experienced by women, denying them full access to the capital; the position of ethnic minorities, and the perspectives of local communities. Using the case studies of Docklands and Kings Cross, the author's raise the crucial question of the government of the capital. This review of the city concludes with an analysis of a potential vision for London involving both the creation of the necessary institutional structures and also the will to address the needs of all the capital's citizens. The authors argue that a strategic approach is needed which accepts that the market alone cannot solve the problem. Stronger public intervention and government action is necessary if London is to match the developments in other European cities.

Last Hope Island

Last Hope Island
Author: Lynne Olson
Publsiher: Random House
Total Pages: 576
Release: 2017-04-25
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780812997361

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A groundbreaking account of how Britain became the base of operations for the exiled leaders of Europe in their desperate struggle to reclaim their continent from Hitler, from the New York Times bestselling author of Citizens of London and Those Angry Days When the Nazi blitzkrieg rolled over continental Europe in the early days of World War II, the city of London became a refuge for the governments and armed forces of six occupied nations who escaped there to continue the fight. So, too, did General Charles de Gaulle, the self-appointed representative of free France. As the only European democracy still holding out against Hitler, Britain became known to occupied countries as “Last Hope Island.” Getting there, one young emigré declared, was “like getting to heaven.” In this epic, character-driven narrative, acclaimed historian Lynne Olson takes us back to those perilous days when the British and their European guests joined forces to combat the mightiest military force in history. Here we meet the courageous King Haakon of Norway, whose distinctive “H7” monogram became a symbol of his country’s resistance to Nazi rule, and his fiery Dutch counterpart, Queen Wilhelmina, whose antifascist radio broadcasts rallied the spirits of her defeated people. Here, too, is the Earl of Suffolk, a swashbuckling British aristocrat whose rescue of two nuclear physicists from France helped make the Manhattan Project possible. Last Hope Island also recounts some of the Europeans’ heretofore unsung exploits that helped tilt the balance against the Axis: the crucial efforts of Polish pilots during the Battle of Britain; the vital role played by French and Polish code breakers in cracking the Germans’ reputedly indecipherable Enigma code; and the flood of top-secret intelligence about German operations—gathered by spies throughout occupied Europe—that helped ensure the success of the 1944 Allied invasion. A fascinating companion to Citizens of London, Olson’s bestselling chronicle of the Anglo-American alliance, Last Hope Island recalls with vivid humanity that brief moment in time when the peoples of Europe stood together in their effort to roll back the tide of conquest and restore order to a broken continent. Praise for Last Hope Island “In Last Hope Island [Lynne Olson] argues an arresting new thesis: that the people of occupied Europe and the expatriate leaders did far more for their own liberation than historians and the public alike recognize. . . . The scale of the organization she describes is breathtaking.”—The New York Times Book Review “Last Hope Island is a book to be welcomed, both for the past it recovers and also, quite simply, for being such a pleasant tome to read.”—The Washington Post “[A] pointed volume . . . [Olson] tells a great story and has a fine eye for character.”—The Boston Globe

Troublesome Young Men

Troublesome Young Men
Author: Lynne Olson
Publsiher: Macmillan
Total Pages: 464
Release: 2008-04-29
Genre: Biography & Autobiography
ISBN: 0374531331

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Describes how, in 1940, a group of rebellious Tory members of Parliament defied the appeasement policies of British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain to force his resignation and bring to power Winston Churchill.

The Road to Somewhere

The Road to Somewhere
Author: David Goodhart
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 256
Release: 2020-01-15
Genre: Political participation
ISBN: 9781787382688

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A robust and timely investigation into the political and moral fault-lines that divide Brexit Britain and Trump's America -- and how a new settlement may be achieved. Several decades of greater economic and cultural openness in the West have not benefited all our citizens. Among those who have been left behind, a populist politics of culture and identity has successfully challenged the traditional politics of Left and Right, creating a new division: between the mobile achieved identity of the people from Anywhere, and the marginalized, roots-based identity of the people from Somewhere. This schism accounts for the Brexit vote, the election of Donald Trump, the decline of the center-left, and the rise of populism across Europe. David Goodhart's compelling investigation of the new global politics reveals how the Somewhere backlash is a democratic response to the dominance of Anywhere interests, in everything from mass higher education to mass immigration.

Those Angry Days

Those Angry Days
Author: Lynne Olson
Publsiher: Random House Incorporated
Total Pages: 548
Release: 2013
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781400069743

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Traces the crisis period leading up to America's entry in World War II, describing the nation's polarized interventionist and isolation factions as represented by the government, in the press and on the streets, in an account that explores the forefront roles of British-supporter President Roosevelt and isolationist Charles Lindbergh. (This book was previously featured in Forecast.)

London is the Place for Me

London is the Place for Me
Author: Kennetta Hammond Perry
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 317
Release: 2015
Genre: Africa
ISBN: 9780190240202

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In London Is The Place for Me, Kennetta Hammond Perry explores how Afro-Caribbean migrants navigated the politics of race and citizenship in Britain and reconfigured the boundaries of what it meant to be both Black and British at a critical juncture in the history of Empire and twentieth century transnational race politics. She situates their experience within a broader context of Black imperial and diasporic political participation, and examines the pushback-both legal and physical-that the migrants' presence provoked. Bringing together a variety of sources including calypso music, photographs, migrant narratives, and records of grassroots Black political organizations, London Is the Place for Me positions Black Britons as part of wider public debates both at home and abroad about citizenship, the meaning of Britishness and the politics of race in the second half of the twentieth century.

Common Prostitutes and Ordinary Citizens

Common Prostitutes and Ordinary Citizens
Author: J. Laite
Publsiher: Springer
Total Pages: 299
Release: 2011-12-02
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780230354210

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Between 1885 and 1960, laws and policies designed to repress prostitution dramatically shaped London's commercial sex industry. This book examines how laws translated into street-level reality, explores how women who sold sex experienced criminalization, and charts the complex dimensions of the underground sexual economy in the modern metropolis.

A Citizen s Guide to Artificial Intelligence

A Citizen s Guide to Artificial Intelligence
Author: John Zerilli
Publsiher: MIT Press
Total Pages: 232
Release: 2021-02-23
Genre: Computers
ISBN: 9780262044813

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A concise but informative overview of AI ethics and policy. Artificial intelligence, or AI for short, has generated a staggering amount of hype in the past several years. Is it the game-changer it's been cracked up to be? If so, how is it changing the game? How is it likely to affect us as customers, tenants, aspiring home-owners, students, educators, patients, clients, prison inmates, members of ethnic and sexual minorities, voters in liberal democracies? This book offers a concise overview of moral, political, legal and economic implications of AI. It covers the basics of AI's latest permutation, machine learning, and considers issues including transparency, bias, liability, privacy, and regulation.

Responsible Citizens Irresponsible States

Responsible Citizens  Irresponsible States
Author: Avia Pasternak
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 135
Release: 2021-08-13
Genre: Philosophy
ISBN: 9780197541050

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States are often held responsible for their wrongdoings. States pay compensation for their unjust wars, as did Iraq in the aftermath of its invasion of Kuwait. States pay reparations for their historical wrongdoings, as did Chile to the victims of the Pinochet Regime, or Germany to Israel and other countries because of the Holocaust. Some argue that they should pay punitive damages for their international crimes as well. But state responsibility has a troubling feature: states are corporate agents, comprising flesh and blood citizens. When they turn to the public purse to finance their corporate liabilities, it is their citizens who pay the price. Even citizens who protested against their state's policies, did not know about them, or had no influence on policy makers end up sharing the burden. Why should these citizens pay for their state's wrongdoings, if they don't carry the blame? Responsible Citizens, Irresponsible States develops a fresh justification for citizens' duties to share the burden of their state's wrongdoings. This justification revolves around citizens' participation in their state: drawing on recent debates in the philosophy of collective action, Avia Pasternak shows that citizens are acting together in their state and that their state policies are the product of this collective action. Given this participation, citizens ought to share the burden of remedying harmful wrongs their state policies bring about. However, she also argues that not all citizens in all states are participating in their state. In many authoritarian states, citizens' participation in the state is highly restricted or coerced. Here, ordinary citizens do not share responsibility for their state policies and should not be forced to pay for them. These conclusions carry significant real-world implications for the way domestic international law holds various types of states, and their citizens, responsible for their wrongdoings. This work is essential for political theorists and philosophers grappling with citizen responsibility and duty.

Citizens of Nowhere

Citizens of Nowhere
Author: Lorenzo Marsili,Niccolò Milanese
Publsiher: Bloomsbury Publishing
Total Pages: 273
Release: 2018-05-15
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 9781786993717

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Europe might appear like a continent pulling itself apart. Ten years of economic and political crises have pitted North versus South, East versus West, citizens versus institutions. And yet, these years have also shown a hidden vitality of Europeans acting across borders, with civil society and social movements showing that alternatives to the status quo already exist. This book is at once a narrative of the experience of activism and a manifesto for change. Through analysing the ways in which neoliberalism, nationalism and borders intertwine, Marsili and Milanese – co-founders of European Alternatives – argue that we are in the middle of a great global transformation, by which we have all become citizens of nowhere. Ultimately, they argue that only by organising in a new transnational political party will the citizens of nowhere be able to struggle effectively for the utopian agency to transform the world.