Empires and Encounters

Empires and Encounters
Author: Wolfgang Reinhard
Publsiher: Belknap Press
Total Pages: 1160
Release: 2015-06-09
Genre: History
ISBN: 0674047192

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"Empires and Encounters presents information on different aspects of human life in all parts of the world from the period 1350 to 1750. In the first centuries of that period people of different parts of the world were not only culturally different but also knew little or even nothing of each other. The Incas for instance had no idea of the existence of Europeans or Africans and vice versa. Inside large regions of the world, however, political interaction, as well as economic and cultural exchange, had been going on for many centuries and was during this period increasing in intensity because this was a time of worldwide empire-building. The chapters of the book examine Eurasia between Japan and Russia; the Ottoman and Iranian Empires of the Muslim world;Mughal India and the trading world of the Indian Ocean; the multicolored world of maritime Southeast Asia and Oceania; and the continents on both sides of the Atlantic under the growing impact of Europe. Europe at this time had no privileged power position, but it did enjoy a special role in establishing regular maritime interaction across the Atlantic and worldwide between the five macro-regions of the globe. The European world economy, based upon the silver of Spanish America, initiated modern globalization"--Provided by publisher.

Empires of God

Empires of God
Author: Linda Gregerson,Susan Juster
Publsiher: University of Pennsylvania Press
Total Pages: 334
Release: 2013-04-08
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780812222609

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Religion and empire were inseparable forces in the early modern Atlantic world. Religious passions and conflicts drove much of the expansionist energy of post-Reformation Europe, providing both a rationale and a practical mode of organizing the dispersal and resettlement of hundreds of thousands of people from the Old World to the New World. Exhortations to conquer new peoples were the lingua franca of Western imperialism, and men like the mystically inclined Christopher Columbus were genuinely inspired to risk their lives and their fortunes to bring the gospel to the Americas. And in the thousands of religious refugees seeking asylum from the vicious wars of religion that tore the continent apart in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, these visionary explorers found a ready pool of migrants—English Puritans and Quakers, French Huguenots, German Moravians, Scots-Irish Presbyterians—equally willing to risk life and limb for a chance to worship God in their own way. Focusing on the formative period of European exploration, settlement, and conquest in the Americas, from roughly 1500 to 1760, Empires of God brings together historians and literary scholars of the English, French, and Spanish Americas around a common set of questions: How did religious communities and beliefs create empires, and how did imperial structures transform New World religions? How did Europeans and Native Americans make sense of each other's spiritual systems, and what acts of linguistic and cultural transition did this entail? What was the role of violence in New World religious encounters? Together, the essays collected here demonstrate the power of religious ideas and narratives to create kingdoms both imagined and real.

Close Encounters of Empire

Close Encounters of Empire
Author: Emily S. Rosenberg,Gilbert Michael Joseph,Catherine LeGrand,Ricardo Donato Salvatore
Publsiher: Duke University Press
Total Pages: 575
Release: 1998
Genre: History
ISBN: 0822320991

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Essays that suggest new ways of understanding the role that US actors and agencies have played in Latin America." - publisher.

Empire And Others

Empire And Others
Author: Professor M Daunton,Rick Halpern
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 412
Release: 2020-09-11
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781000144543

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Much has been written about the forging of a British identity in the 17th and 18th centuries, from the multiple kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland. But the process also ran across the Irish sea and was played out in North America and the Caribbean. In the process, the indigenous peoples of North America, the Caribbean, the Cape, Australia and New Zealand were forced to redefine their identities. This text integrates the history of these areas with British and imperial history. With contributions from both sides of the Atlantic, each chapter deals with a different aspect of British encounters with indigenous peoples in Colonial America and includes, for example, sections on "Native Americans and Early Modern Concepts of Race" and "Hunting and the Politics of Masculinity in Cherokee treaty-making, 1763-1775". This book should be of particular interest to postgraduate students of Colonial American history and early modern British history.

Empires of the Senses

Empires of the Senses
Author: Andrew J. Rotter
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 400
Release: 2019-06-21
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780190924713

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When encountering unfamiliar environments in India and the Philippines, the British and the Americans wrote extensively about the first taste of mango and meat spiced with cumin, the smell of excrement and coconut oil, the feel of humidity and rough cloth against skin, the sound of bells and insects, and the appearance of dark-skinned natives and lepers. So too did the colonial subjects they encountered perceive the agents of empire through their senses and their skins. Empire of course involved economics, geopolitics, violence, a desire for order and greatness, a craving for excitement and adventure. It also involved an encounter between authorities and subjects, an everyday process of social interaction, political negotiation, policing, schooling, and healing. While these all concerned what people thought about each other, perceptions of others, as Andrew Rotter shows, were also formed through seeing, hearing, touching, smelling, and tasting. In this book, Rotter offers a sensory history of the British in India from the formal imposition of their rule to its end (1857-1947) and the Americans in the Philippines from annexation to independence (1898-1946). The British and the Americans saw themselves as the civilizers of what they judged backward societies, and they believed that a vital part of the civilizing process was to properly prioritize the senses and to ensure them against offense or affront. Societies that looked shabby, were noisy and smelly, felt wrong, and consumed unwholesome food in unmannerly ways were unfit for self-government. It was the duty of allegedly more sensorily advanced Anglo-Americans to educate them before formally withdrawing their power. Indians and Filipinos had different ideas of what constituted sensory civilization and to some extent resisted imperial efforts to impose their own versions. What eventually emerged were compromises between these nations' sensory regimes. A fascinating and original comparative work, Empires of the Senses offers new perspectives on imperial history.

Imperial Co operation and Transfer 1870 1930

Imperial Co operation and Transfer  1870 1930
Author: Anonim
Publsiher: Bloomsbury Publishing
Total Pages: 272
Release: 2015-08-27
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781472592156

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Conflict and competition between imperial powers has long been a feature of global history, but their co-operation has largely been a peripheral concern. Imperial Co-operation and Transfer, 1870-1930 redresses this imbalance, providing a coherent conceptual framework for the study of inter-imperial collaboration and arguing that it deserves an equally prominent position in the field. Using a variety of examples from across Asia, Europe and Africa, this book demonstrates the ways in which empires have shared and exchanged their knowledge about imperial governance, including military strategy, religious influence and political surveillance. It asks how, when and where these partnerships took place, and who initiated them. Not only does this book fill an empirical gap in the study of imperial history, it traces ideas of empire from their conception in imperial contact zones to their implementation in specific contexts. As such, this is an important study for imperial and global historians of all specialisms.

At the Heart of the Empire

At the Heart of the Empire
Author: Antoinette Burton
Publsiher: Univ of California Press
Total Pages: 304
Release: 1998-03-30
Genre: History
ISBN: 0520919459

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Antoinette Burton focuses on the experiences of three Victorian travelers in Britain to illustrate how "Englishness" was made and remade in relation to imperialism. The accounts left by these three sojourners—all prominent, educated Indians—represent complex, critical ethnographies of "native" metropolitan society and offer revealing glimpses of what it was like to be a colonial subject in fin-de-siècle Britain. Burton's innovative interpretation of the travelers' testimonies shatters the myth of Britain's insularity from its own construction of empire and shows that it was instead a terrain open to continual contest and refiguration. Burton's three subjects felt the influence of imperial power keenly during even the most everyday encounters in Britain. Pandita Ramabai arrived in London in 1883 seeking a medical education and left in 1886, having resisted the Anglican Church's attempts to make her an evangelical missionary. Cornelia Sorabji went to Oxford to study law and became the first Indian woman to be called to the Bar. Behramji Malabari sought help for his Indian reform projects in England, and subjected London to colonial scrutiny in the process. Their experiences form the basis of this wide-ranging, clearly written, and imaginative investigation of diasporic movement in the colonial metropolis.

Gardens of Renaissance Europe and the Islamic Empires

Gardens of Renaissance Europe and the Islamic Empires
Author: Mohammad Gharipour
Publsiher: Penn State Press
Total Pages: 272
Release: 2017-11-16
Genre: Architecture
ISBN: 9780271080673

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The cross-cultural exchange of ideas that flourished in the Mediterranean during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries profoundly affected European and Islamic society. Gardens of Renaissance Europe and the Islamic Empires considers the role and place of gardens and landscapes in the broader context of the information sharing that took place among Europeans and Islamic empires in Turkey, Persia, and India. In illustrating commonalities in the design, development, and people’s perceptions of gardens and nature in both regions, this volume substantiates important parallels in the revolutionary advancements in landscape architecture that took place during the era. The contributors explain how the exchange of gardeners as well as horticultural and irrigation techniques influenced design traditions in the two cultures; examine concurrent shifts in garden and urban landscape design, such as the move toward more public functionality; and explore the mutually influential effects of politics, economics, and culture on composed outdoor space. In doing so, they shed light on the complexity of cultures and politics during the Renaissance. A thoughtfully composed look at the effects of cross-cultural exchange on garden design during a pivotal time in world history, this thought-provoking book points to new areas in inquiry about the influences, confluences, and connections between European and Islamic garden traditions. In addition to the editor, the contributors include Cristina Castel-Branco, Paula Henderson, Simone M. Kaiser, Ebba Koch, Christopher Pastore, Laurent Paya, D. Fairchild Ruggles, Jill Sinclair, and Anatole Tchikine.

Iranian Russian Encounters

Iranian Russian Encounters
Author: Stephanie Cronin
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 411
Release: 2013
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780415624336

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Over the past two hundred years, encounters between Iran and Russia have been both rich and complex. This book explores the myriad dimensions of the Iranian-Russian encounter during a dramatic period which saw both Iran and Russia subject to revolutionary upheavals and transformed from multinational dynastic empires typical of the nineteenth century to modernizing, authoritarian states typical of the twentieth. The collection provides a fresh perspective on traditional preoccupations of international relations: wars and diplomacy, the hostility of opposing nationalisms, the Russian imperial menace in the nineteenth century and the Soviet threat in the twentieth. Going beyond the traditional, this book examines subaltern as well as elite relations and combines a cultural, social and intellectual dimension with the political and diplomatic. In doing so the book seeks to construct a new discourse which contests the notion of an implacable enmity between Iran and Russia Bringing together leading scholars in the field, this book demonstrates extensive use of family archives, Iranian, Russian and Caucasian travelogues and memoirs, and newly available archives in both Iran and the countries of the former Soviet Union. Providing essential background to current international tensions, this book will be of particular use to students and scholars with an interest in the Middle East and Russia.

Empire of the Senses

Empire of the Senses
Author: Daniela Hacke,Paul Musselwhite
Publsiher: BRILL
Total Pages: 344
Release: 2017-10-30
Genre: History
ISBN: 9789004340640

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Empire of the Senses introduces new approaches to the history of European imperialism in the Americas by questioning the role that the five senses played in framing the cultural encounters, colonial knowledge, and political relationships that built New World empires.

European Empires in the American South

European Empires in the American South
Author: Joseph P. Ward
Publsiher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
Total Pages: 264
Release: 2017-09-08
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781496812209

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Contributions by Allison Margaret Bigelow, Denise I. Bossy, Alejandra Dubcovsky, Alexandre Dub", Kathleen DuVal, Jonathan Eacott, Travis Glasson, Christopher Morris, Robert Olwell, Joshua Piker, and Joseph P. Ward European Empires in the American South examines the process of European expansion into a region that has come to be known as the American South. After Europeans began to cross the Atlantic with confidence, they interacted for three hundred years with one another, with the native people of the region, and with enslaved Africans in ways that made the South a significant arena of imperial ambition. As such, it was one of several similarly contested regions around the Atlantic basin. Without claiming that the South was unique during the colonial era, these essays make clear the region's integral importance for anyone seeking to shed new light on the long-term process of global social, cultural, and economic integration. For those who are curious about how the broad processes of historical change influenced particular people and places, the contributors offer key examples of colonial encounter. This volume includes essays on all three imperial powers, Spain, Britain, and France, and their imperial projects in the American South. Engaging profitably--from the European perspective at least--with Native Americans proved key to these colonial schemes. While the consequences of Indian encounters with European invaders have long remained a principal feature of historical research, this volume advances and expands knowledge of Native Americans in the South amid the Atlantic World.

Tsar and Sultan

Tsar and Sultan
Author: Victor Taki
Publsiher: Bloomsbury Publishing
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2016-06-20
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780857728036

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Tsar and Sultan offers a unique insight into Russian Orientalism as the intellectual force behind Russian-Ottoman encounters. Through war diaries and memoirs, accounts of captivity and diplomatic correspondences, Victor Taki's analysis of military documents demonstrates a crucial aspect of Russia's discovery of the Orient based on its rivalry with the Ottoman Empire. Narratives depicting the brutal realities of Russian-Turkish military conflicts influenced the Orientalisation of the Ottoman Empire. In turn, Russian identity was built as the counter-image to the demonised Turk. This book explains the significance of Russian Orientalism on Russian identity and national policies of westernisation. Students of both European and Middle East studies will appreciate Taki's unique approach to Russian-Turkish relations and their influence on Eurasian history.

Empire Architecture and the City

Empire  Architecture  and the City
Author: Zeynep Çelik,Zeynep Çelik Alexander
Publsiher: Studies in Modernity and Natio
Total Pages: 337
Release: 2008
Genre: Architecture
ISBN: UOM:39015079208198

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Examines the cities of Algeria and Tunisia under French colonial rule and those of the Ottoman Arab provinces, providing a nuanced look at cross-cultural exchanges.

Mediterranean Encounters

Mediterranean Encounters
Author: Fariba Zarinebaf
Publsiher: Univ of California Press
Total Pages: 424
Release: 2018-07-24
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780520964310

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Mediterranean Encounters traces the layered history of Galata—a Mediterranean and Black Sea port—to the Ottoman conquest, and its transformation into a hub of European trade and diplomacy as well as a pluralist society of the early modern period. Framing the history of Ottoman-European encounters within the institution of ahdnames (commercial and diplomatic treaties), this thoughtful book offers a critical perspective on the existing scholarship. For too long, the Ottoman empire has been defined as an absolutist military power driven by religious conviction, culturally and politically apart from the rest of Europe, and devoid of a commercial policy. By taking a close look at Galata, Fariba Zarinebaf provides a different approach based on a history of commerce, coexistence, competition, and collaboration through the lens of Ottoman legal records, diplomatic correspondence, and petitions. She shows that this port was just as cosmopolitan and pluralist as any large European port and argues that the Ottoman world was not peripheral to European modernity but very much part of it.

Imperial Encounters

Imperial Encounters
Author: Peter van der Veer
Publsiher: Princeton University Press
Total Pages: 216
Release: 2020-07-07
Genre: Religion
ISBN: 9781400831081

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Picking up on Edward Said's claim that the historical experience of empire is common to both the colonizer and the colonized, Peter van der Veer takes the case of religion to examine the mutual impact of Britain's colonization of India on Indian and British culture. He shows that national culture in both India and Britain developed in relation to their shared colonial experience and that notions of religion and secularity were crucial in imagining the modern nation in both countries. In the process, van der Veer chronicles how these notions developed in the second half of the nineteenth century in relation to gender, race, language, spirituality, and science. Avoiding the pitfalls of both world systems theory and national historiography, this book problematizes oppositions between modern and traditional, secular and religious, progressive and reactionary. It shows that what often are assumed to be opposites are, in fact, profoundly entangled. In doing so, it upsets the convenient fiction that India is the land of eternal religion, existing outside of history, while Britain is the epitome of modern secularity and an agent of history. Van der Veer also accounts for the continuing role of religion in British culture and the strong part religion has played in the development of Indian civil society. This masterly work of scholarship brings into view the effects of the very close encounter between India and Britain--an intimate encounter that defined the character of both nations.