Haiti

Haiti
Author: Philippe Girard
Publsiher: Macmillan
Total Pages: 248
Release: 2010-09-14
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780230106611

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In the aftermath of January's horrific earthquake, the world's attention is focused on Haiti. In this full narrative history of the Caribbean nation, historian Philippe Girard offers insight into Haiti's complex and layered past, showing that its current state as the poorest country in the western hemisphere was not inevitable. This highly readable and accessible history takes the reader back two hundred years to a time when Haiti was so prosperous it was known as the Pearl of the Antilles. Haiti was the only country in the Americas to pull off a successful slave revolution, yet today its survival is completely dependent on foreign aid. As all eyes turn to watch what happens to Haiti, author Girard provides the necessary context for envisioning its future - including a detailed account of the quake's consequences, an assessment of the benefit and cost of an American intervention, and commentary on what Haiti must do to rebuild for a brighter future.

Haiti The Tumultuous History From Pearl of the Caribbean to Broken Nation

Haiti  The Tumultuous History   From Pearl of the Caribbean to Broken Nation
Author: Philippe Girard
Publsiher: St. Martin's Press
Total Pages: 256
Release: 2010-09-14
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 0230112900

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Why has Haiti been plagued by so many woes? Why have multiple U.S. efforts to create a stable democracy in Haiti failed so spectacularly? Philippe Girard answers these and other questions, examining how colonialism and slavery have left a legacy of racial tension, both within Haiti and internationally; Haitians remain deeply suspicious of white foriegners' motives, many of whom doubt Hatians' ability to govern themselves. He also examines how Haiti's current political instability is merely a continuation of political strife that began during the War of Independence (1791-1804). Finally, Haiti: The Tumultuous History, Girard explores poverty's devastating impact on contemporary Haiti and argues that Haitians--particularly home-grown dictators--bear a big share of the responsibility for their nation's troubles.

Paradise Lost

Paradise Lost
Author: P. Girard
Publsiher: Springer
Total Pages: 230
Release: 2005-12-13
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 9781403980311

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Why has Haiti been plagued by so many woes? Why has the United States felt a need to repeatedly intervene in Haiti's affairs? Why have multiple U.S. efforts to create a stable democracy in Haiti failed so spectacularly? Philippe Girard answers these and other questions in Paradise Lost . He examines how colonialism and slavery have left a legacy of racial tension, both within Haiti and internationally, as Haitians remain deeply suspicious of white foreigners' motives, many of whom doubt Haitians' ability to govern themselves. He also examines how Haiti's current political instability is merely a continuation of two hundred years of political strife that began during the War of Independence (1791-1804). Finally, Girard explores poverty's devastating impact on contemporary Haiti. This book is different from others in the field, arguing that Haitians - particularly home-grown dictators - bear a big share of the responsibility for their nation's troubles. In addressing the current situation in Haiti by looking to the nation's tumultuous past, Paradise Lost is timely and potentially controversial.

Haiti

Haiti
Author: Philippe R. Girard
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 248
Release: 2010
Genre: Haiti
ISBN: OCLC:1197380669

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Haiti The Aftershocks of History

Haiti  The Aftershocks of History
Author: Laurent Dubois
Publsiher: Metropolitan Books
Total Pages: 448
Release: 2012-01-03
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780805095623

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A passionate and insightful account by a leading historian of Haiti that traces the sources of the country's devastating present back to its turbulent and traumatic history Even before the 2010 earthquake destroyed much of the country, Haiti was known as a benighted place of poverty and corruption. Maligned and misunderstood, the nation has long been blamed by many for its own wretchedness. But as acclaimed historian Laurent Dubois makes clear, Haiti's troubled present can only be understood by examining its complex past. The country's difficulties are inextricably rooted in its founding revolution—the only successful slave revolt in the history of the world; the hostility that this rebellion generated among the colonial powers surrounding the island nation; and the intense struggle within Haiti itself to define its newfound freedom and realize its promise. Dubois vividly depicts the isolation and impoverishment that followed the 1804 uprising. He details how the crushing indemnity imposed by the former French rulers initiated a devastating cycle of debt, while frequent interventions by the United States—including a twenty-year military occupation—further undermined Haiti's independence. At the same time, Dubois shows, the internal debates about what Haiti should do with its hard-won liberty alienated the nation's leaders from the broader population, setting the stage for enduring political conflict. Yet as Dubois demonstrates, the Haitian people have never given up on their struggle for true democracy, creating a powerful culture insistent on autonomy and equality for all. Revealing what lies behind the familiar moniker of "the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere," this indispensable book illuminates the foundations on which a new Haiti might yet emerge.

Paradise Lost Haiti s

Paradise Lost Haiti s
Author: Philippe R. Girard
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 229
Release: 2005
Genre: Electronic Book
ISBN: OCLC:1025995434

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Haiti s Influence on Antebellum America

Haiti s Influence on Antebellum America
Author: Alfred N. Hunt
Publsiher: LSU Press
Total Pages: 216
Release: 2006-08-01
Genre: History
ISBN: 0807131970

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The Haitian Revolution began in 1791 as a slave revolt on the French colonial island of Saint Domingue and ended thirteen years later with the founding of an independent black republic. Waves of French West Indians -- slaves, white colonists, and free blacks -- fled the upheaval and flooded southern U.S. ports -- most notably New Orleans -- bringing with them everything from French opera to voodoo. Alfred N. Hunt discusses the ways these immigrants affected southern agriculture, architecture, language, politics, medicine, religion, and the arts. He also considers how the events in Haiti influenced the American slavery-emancipation debate and spurred developments in black militancy and Pan-Africanism in the United States. By effecting the development of racial ideology in antebellum America, Hunt concludes, the Haitian Revolution was a major contributing factor to the attitudes that led to the Civil War.

Haitian Connections in the Atlantic World

Haitian Connections in the Atlantic World
Author: Julia Gaffield
Publsiher: UNC Press Books
Total Pages: 270
Release: 2015-09-24
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781469625638

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On January 1, 1804, Haiti shocked the world by declaring independence. Historians have long portrayed Haiti's postrevolutionary period as one during which the international community rejected Haiti's Declaration of Independence and adopted a policy of isolation designed to contain the impact of the world's only successful slave revolution. Julia Gaffield, however, anchors a fresh vision of Haiti's first tentative years of independence to its relationships with other nations and empires and reveals the surprising limits of the country's supposed isolation. Gaffield frames Haitian independence as both a practical and an intellectual challenge to powerful ideologies of racial hierarchy and slavery, national sovereignty, and trade practice. Yet that very independence offered a new arena in which imperial powers competed for advantages with respect to military strategy, economic expansion, and international law. In dealing with such concerns, foreign governments, merchants, abolitionists, and others provided openings that were seized by early Haitian leaders who were eager to negotiate new economic and political relationships. Although full political acceptance was slow to come, economic recognition was extended by degrees to Haiti--and this had diplomatic implications. Gaffield's account of Haitian history highlights how this layered recognition sustained Haitian independence.

The Making of Haiti

The Making of Haiti
Author: Carolyn E. Fick
Publsiher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
Total Pages: 355
Release: 1990
Genre: History
ISBN: 0870496670

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"The present work is an attempt to illustrate the nature and the impact of the popular mentality and popular movements on the course of revolutionary (and, in part, postrevolutionary) events in eighteenth-century Saint-Domingue." --pref.

No Tears for the Dead

No Tears for the Dead
Author: Ryan Daniel Bacci,Iona College
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 146
Release: 2014
Genre: Economic assistance
ISBN: OCLC:880675635

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The Slaves Who Defeated Napoleon

The Slaves Who Defeated Napoleon
Author: Philippe R. Girard
Publsiher: University of Alabama Press
Total Pages: 444
Release: 2011-11-02
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780817317324

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In this ambitious book, Girard employs the latest tools of the historian s craft, multi-archival research in particular, and applies them to the climactic yet poorly understood last years of the Haitian Revolution. Haiti lost most of its archives to neglect and theft, but a substantial number of documents survive in French, U.S., British, and Spanish collections, both public and private. In all, this book relies on contemporary military, commercial, and administrative sources drawn from nineteen archives and research libraries on both sides of the Atlantic."

A Taste of Haiti

A Taste of Haiti
Author: Mirta Yurnet-Thomas
Publsiher: Hippocrene Books
Total Pages: 215
Release: 2004
Genre: Cooking
ISBN: 0781809983

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With African, French, Arabic and Amerindian influences, the food and culture of Haiti are fascinating subjects to explore. From the days of slavery to present times, traditional Haitian cuisine has relied upon staples like root vegetables, pork, fish, and flavour enhancers like Pikliz (picklese, or hot pepper vinegar) and Zepis (ground spices). This cookbook offers over 100 Haitian recipes, including traditional holiday foods and the author's favourite drinks and desserts. Information on Haiti's history, holidays and celebrations, necessary food staples, and cooking methods will guide the home chef on a culinary adventure to this beautiful island. Recipe titles are given in English, Creole, and French.

The Haitian Revolution

The Haitian Revolution
Author: Toussaint L'Ouverture
Publsiher: Verso Books
Total Pages: 176
Release: 2019-11-12
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781788736572

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Toussaint L’Ouverture was the leader of the Haitian Revolution in the late eighteenth century, in which slaves rebelled against their masters and established the first black republic. In this collection of his writings and speeches, former Haitian politician Jean-Bertrand Aristide demonstrates L’Ouverture’s profound contribution to the struggle for equality.

Haiti

Haiti
Author: Elizabeth Abbott
Publsiher: Abrams
Total Pages: 496
Release: 2011-07-21
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781468301601

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Renowned author Elizabeth Abbott, who lived and wrote in Haiti, begins with the notorious Duvaliers—father and son—and explores their legacy to the present day. In 1803, the enslaved people of Haiti vanquished their French masters after a bloody war which left tens of thousands dead. Since then, the Haitian people have endured more than one corrupt regime that drove millions into exile, cowed those who remained, and tortured hundreds of thousands. In this revised and updated edition, Abbott ably shows how the early dictators’ legacy shaped modern Haiti as she traces the repercussions of their actions to the present day, and the disastrous earthquake that shook the world.

Haitian History

Haitian History
Author: Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 335
Release: 2012
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780415808675

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Despite Haiti's proximity to the United States, and its considerable importance to our own history, Haiti barely registered in the historic consciousness of most Americans until recently. Those who struggled to understand Haiti's suffering in the earthquake of 2010 often spoke of it as the poorest country in the Western hemisphere, but could not explain how it came to be so. In recent years, the amount of scholarship about the island has increased dramatically. Whereas once this scholarship was focused on Haiti's political or military leaders, now the historiography of Haiti features lively debates and different schools of thought. Even as this body of knowledge has developed, it has been hard for students to grasp its various strands. Haitian History presents the best of the recent articles on Haitian history, by both Haitian and foreign scholars, moving from colonial Saint Domingue to the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake. It will be the go-to one-volume introduction to the field of Haitian history, helping to explain how the promise of the Haitian Revolution dissipated, and presenting the major debates and questions in the field today.