Hakluyt s Promise

Hakluyt s Promise
Author: Peter C. Mancall
Publsiher: Yale University Press
Total Pages: 378
Release: 2010-03-16
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780300164220

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"Hakluyt's Promise demonstrates [Hakluyt's] prominent role in the establishment of English America as well as his interests in English opportunities in the East Indies. The volume presents nearly fifty illustrations - many unpublished since the sixteenth century - and offers a fresh view of Hakluyt's milieu and the central concerns of the Elizabethan age"--Jacket.

Richard Hakluyt and Travel Writing in Early Modern Europe

Richard Hakluyt and Travel Writing in Early Modern Europe
Author: Professor Claire Jowitt,Dr Daniel Carey
Publsiher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
Total Pages: 398
Release: 2012-09-01
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781409461746

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Richard Hakluyt, best known as editor of The Principal Navigations (1589; expanded 1598-1600), was a key figure in promoting early modern English colonial and commercial expansion. His work spanned every area of English activity and aspiration, from Muscovy to America, from Africa to the Near East, and India to China and Japan, providing up-to-date information and establishing an ideological framework for English rivalries with Spain, Portugal, France, and the Netherlands. This interdisciplinary collection of 24 essays brings together the best international scholarship on Hakluyt, revising our picture of the influences on his work, his editorial practice and his impact.

Richard Hakluyt and Travel Writing in Early Modern Europe

Richard Hakluyt and Travel Writing in Early Modern Europe
Author: Claire Jowitt
Publsiher: CRC Press
Total Pages: 404
Release: 2016-03-23
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781317063100

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Richard Hakluyt and Travel Writing in Early Modern Europe is an interdisciplinary collection of 24 essays which brings together leading international scholarship on Hakluyt and his work. Best known as editor of The Principal Navigations (1589; expanded 1598-1600), Hakluyt was a key figure in promoting English colonial and commercial expansion in the early modern period. He also translated major European travel texts, championed English settlement in North America, and promoted global trade and exploration via a Northeast and Northwest Passage. His work spanned every area of English activity and aspiration, from Muscovy to America, from Africa to the Near East, and India to China and Japan, providing up-to-date information and establishing an ideological framework for English rivalries with Spain, Portugal, France, and the Netherlands. This volume resituates Hakluyt in the political, economic, and intellectual context of his time. The genre of the travel collection to which he contributed emerged from Continental humanist literary culture. Hakluyt adapted this tradition for nationalistic purposes by locating a purported history of 'English' enterprise that stretched as far back as he could go in recovering antiquarian records. The essays in this collection advance the study of Hakluyt's literary and historical resources, his international connections, and his rhetorical and editorial practice. The volume is divided into 5 sections: 'Hakluyt's Contexts'; 'Early Modern Travel Writing Collections'; 'Editorial Practice'; 'Allegiances and Ideologies: Politics, Religion, Nation'; and 'Hakluyt: Rhetoric and Writing'. The volume concludes with an account of the formation and ethos of the Hakluyt Society, founded in 1846, which has continued his project to edit travel accounts of trade, exploration, and adventure.

Author: 张德明著
Publsiher: BEIJING BOOK CO. INC.
Total Pages: 135
Release: 2021-11-12
Genre: Literary Criticism
ISBN: 9182736450XXX

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本书系统考察了其发展历程;对旅行文学涉及的空间想象、帝国崛起、主体意识的形成、近代小说的兴起、现代美学观念的形成,以及跨文化交往与沟通等一系列问题展开探讨,并提出了自己独到的看法;既是一次知识的考古,也是一场精神王国的漫长旅行。

New Worlds Reflected

New Worlds Reflected
Author: Chloë Houston
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 274
Release: 2016-05-06
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781317087755

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Utopias have long interested scholars of the intellectual and literary history of the early modern period. From the time of Thomas More's Utopia (1516), fictional utopias were indebted to contemporary travel narratives, with which they shared interests in physical and metaphorical journeys, processes of exploration and discovery, encounters with new peoples, and exchange between cultures. Travel writers, too, turned to utopian discourses to describe the new worlds and societies they encountered. Both utopia and travel writing came to involve a process of reflection upon their authors' societies and cultures, as well as representations of new and different worlds. As awareness of early modern encounters with new worlds moves beyond the Atlantic World to consider exploration and travel, piracy and cultural exchange throughout the globe, an assessment of the mutual indebtedness of these genres, as well as an introduction to their development, is needed. New Worlds Reflected provides a significant contribution both to the history of utopian literature and travel, and to the wider cultural and intellectual history of the time, assembling original essays from scholars interested in representations of the globe and new and ideal worlds in the period from the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries, and in the imaginative reciprocal responsiveness of utopian and travel writing. Together these essays underline the mutual indebtedness of travel and utopia in the early modern period, and highlight the rich variety of ways in which writers made use of the prospect of new and ideal worlds. New Worlds Reflected showcases new work in the fields of early modern utopian and global studies and will appeal to all scholars interested in such questions.

Making Publics in Early Modern Europe

Making Publics in Early Modern Europe
Author: Bronwen Wilson,Paul Yachnin
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 282
Release: 2011-07-21
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781135168933

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The book looks at how people, things, and new forms of knowledge created "publics" in early modern Europe, and how publics changed the shape of early modern society. The focus is on what the authors call "making publics" — the active creation of new forms of association that allowed people to connect with others in ways not rooted in family, rank or vocation, but rather founded in voluntary groupings built on the shared interests, tastes, commitments, and desires of individuals. By creating new forms of association, cultural producers and consumers challenged dominant ideas about just who could be a public person, greatly expanded the resources of public life for ordinary people in their own time, and developed ideas and practices that have helped create the political culture of modernity. Coming from a number of disciplines including literary and cultural studies, art history, history of religion, history of science, and musicology, the contributors develop analyses of a range of cases of early modern public-making that together demonstrate the rich inventiveness and formative social power of artistic and intellectual publication in this period.

Human Empire

Human Empire
Author: Ted McCormick
Publsiher: Cambridge University Press
Total Pages: 135
Release: 2022-04-30
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 9781009123266

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"This book traces two transformations in early modern English thinking about the governance of populations. The first, spanning the Tudor and early Stuart eras, was a shift in emphasis in defining the real object of demographic knowledge and intervention. While sixteenth-century engagements with what we would consider demographic entities and processes tended to identify particular, qualitatively defined groups (referred to here as "multitudes" to distinguish them from "population" as a quantity) as their units of analysis, by the middle decades of the seventeenth century something much closer to the national population, as a total and knowable number of people, had come to the fore"--

The Corporate Commonwealth

The Corporate Commonwealth
Author: Henry S. Turner
Publsiher: University of Chicago Press
Total Pages: 311
Release: 2016-06-17
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780226363356

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At a time when the standing and status of corporations is much in the news, this study of the early modern history of the concept of the corporation is particularly timely. Henry S. Turner provides a new account of early modern political institutions and political concepts by turning to the history of the corporation as a type of notional person and as a way of organizing collective life. Universities, guilds, towns and cities, religious confraternities, joint-stock companies: all were legal corporations, and all enjoyed rights and freedoms that sometimes exceeded the authority of the State. Drawing on the resources of economic and colonial history, literary criticism, law, political philosophy, and the history of science, Turner reads works by Thomas More, William Shakespeare, Francis Bacon, and Thomas Hobbes, among many others, to find the resources for a new account of corporations as fictional bodies and persons endowed with identities, rights, and the capacity for action. Turner tackles a number of fascinating questions: How did early modern writers make sense of the paradoxical essence of the corporationa collectivity at once imaginary and material, coherent but unbounded, many and at the same time one? And what can the history of the corporation tell us about the history of our own moment, when public goods are increasingly privatized and citizens seek new models of association and meaningful political action? His answers will be of compelling interest to historians, political theorists, literary scholars, and others."

The Head in Edward Nugent s Hand

The Head in Edward Nugent s Hand
Author: Michael Leroy Oberg
Publsiher: University of Pennsylvania Press
Total Pages: 224
Release: 2010-08-26
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780812221336

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Roanoke is part of the lore of early America, the colony that disappeared. Many Americans know of Sir Walter Ralegh's ill-fated expedition, but few know about the Algonquian peoples who were the island's inhabitants. The Head in Edward Nugent's Hand examines Ralegh's plan to create an English empire in the New World but also the attempts of native peoples to make sense of the newcomers who threatened to transform their world in frightening ways. Beginning his narrative well before Ralegh's arrival, Michael Leroy Oberg looks closely at the Indians who first encountered the colonists. The English intruded into a well-established Native American world at Roanoke, led by Wingina, the weroance, or leader, of the Algonquian peoples on the island. Oberg also pays close attention to how the weroance and his people understood the arrival of the English: we watch as Wingina's brother first boards Ralegh's ship, and we listen in as Wingina receives the report of its arrival. Driving the narrative is the leader's ultimate fate: Wingina is decapitated by one of Ralegh's men in the summer of 1586. When the story of Roanoke is recast in an effort to understand how and why an Algonquian weroance was murdered, and with what consequences, we arrive at a more nuanced and sophisticated understanding of what happened during this, the dawn of English settlement in America.

Sir Humphrey Gilbert and the Elizabethan Expedition

Sir Humphrey Gilbert and the Elizabethan Expedition
Author: Nathan J. Probasco
Publsiher: Springer Nature
Total Pages: 285
Release: 2020-11-20
Genre: History
ISBN: 9783030572587

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This book examines the 1583 voyage of Sir Humphrey Gilbert to North America. This was England's first attempt at colonization beyond the British Isles, yet it has not been subject to thorough scholarly analysis for more than 70 years. An exhaustive examination of the voyage reveals the complexity and preparedness of this and similar early modern colonizing expeditions. Prominent Elizabethans assisted Gilbert by researching and investing in his expedition: the Printing Revolution was critical to their plans, as Gilbert’s supporters traveled throughout England with promotional literature proving England’s claim to North America. Gilbert’s experts used maps and charts to publicize and navigate, while his pilots experimented with new navigating tools and practices. Though he failed to establish a settlement, Gilbert created a blueprint for later Stuart colonizers who achieved his vision of a British Empire in the Western Hemisphere. This book clarifies the role of cartography, natural science, and promotional literature in Elizabethan colonization and elucidates the preparation stages of early modern colonizing voyages.

The Routledge Research Companion to Travel Writing

The Routledge Research Companion to Travel Writing
Author: Alasdair Pettinger,Tim Youngs
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 408
Release: 2019-07-14
Genre: Literary Criticism
ISBN: 9781317041191

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Showcasing established and new patterns of research, The Routledge Research Companion to Travel Writing takes an interdisciplinary approach to scholarship and to travel texts themselves. The volume adopts a thematic approach, with each contributor considering a specific aspect of travel writing – a recurrent motif, an organising principle or a literary form. All of the essays include a discussion of representative travel texts, to ensure that the volume as a whole represents a broad historical and geographical range of travel writing. Together, the 25 essays and the editors’ introduction offer a comprehensive and authoritative reflection of the state of travel writing criticism and lay the ground for future developments.

The Trials of Thomas Morton

The Trials of Thomas Morton
Author: Peter C. Mancall
Publsiher: Yale University Press
Total Pages: 288
Release: 2019-11-26
Genre: British Americans
ISBN: 9780300230109

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A new look at Thomas Morton, his controversial colonial philosophy, and his lengthy feud with the Puritans Adding new depth to our understanding of early New England society, this riveting account of Thomas Morton explores the tensions that arose from competing colonial visions. A lawyer and fur trader, Thomas Morton dreamed of a society where Algonquian peoples and English colonists could coexist. Infamous for dancing around a maypole in defiance of his Pilgrim neighbors, Morton was reviled by the Puritans for selling guns to the Natives. Colonial authorities exiled him three separate times from New England, but Morton kept returning to fight for his beliefs. This compelling counter-narrative to the familiar story of the Puritans combines a rich understanding of the period with a close reading of early texts to bring the contentious Morton to life. This volume sheds new light on the tumultuous formative decades of the American experience.

Early Modern Encounters with the Islamic East

Early Modern Encounters with the Islamic East
Author: Sabine Schülting,Sabine Lucia Müller,Ralf Hertel
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 222
Release: 2016-04-29
Genre: Literary Criticism
ISBN: 9781317147060

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An exploration of early modern encounters between Christian Europe and the (Islamic) East from the perspective of performance studies and performativity theories, this collection focuses on the ways in which these cultural contacts were acted out on the real and metaphorical stages of theatre, literature, music, diplomacy and travel. The volume responds to the theatricalization of early modern politics, to contemporary anxieties about the tension between religious performance and belief, to the circulation of material objects in intercultural relations, and the eminent role of theatre and drama for the (re)imagination and negotiation of cultural difference. Contributors examine early modern encounters with and in the East using an innovative combination of literary and cultural theories. They stress the contingent nature of these contacts and demonstrate that they can be read as moments of potentiality in which the future of political and economic relations - as well as the players' cultural, religious and gender identities - are at stake.

The State of Nature Histories of an Idea

The State of Nature  Histories of an Idea
Author: Anonim
Publsiher: BRILL
Total Pages: 440
Release: 2021-12-13
Genre: Law
ISBN: 9789004499621

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Combining intellectual history with current concerns, this volume brings together fourteen essays on the past, present and possible future applications of the legal fiction known as the state of nature.

Mining Language

Mining Language
Author: Allison Margaret Bigelow
Publsiher: UNC Press Books
Total Pages: 376
Release: 2020-04-16
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781469654393

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Mineral wealth from the Americas underwrote and undergirded European colonization of the New World; American gold and silver enriched Spain, funded the slave trade, and spurred Spain's northern European competitors to become Atlantic powers. Building upon works that have narrated this global history of American mining in economic and labor terms, Mining Language is the first book-length study of the technical and scientific vocabularies that miners developed in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries as they engaged with metallic materials. This language-centric focus enables Allison Bigelow to document the crucial intellectual contributions Indigenous and African miners made to the very engine of European colonialism. By carefully parsing the writings of well-known figures such as Cristobal Colon and Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo y Valdes and lesser-known writers such Alvaro Alonso Barba, a Spanish priest who spent most of his life in the Andes, Bigelow uncovers the ways in which Indigenous and African metallurgists aided or resisted imperial mining endeavors, shaped critical scientific practices, and offered imaginative visions of metalwork. Her creative linguistic and visual analyses of archival fragments, images, and texts in languages as diverse as Spanish and Quechua also allow her to reconstruct the processes that led to the silencing of these voices in European print culture.