Map of a Nation

Map of a Nation
Author: Rachel Hewitt
Publsiher: Granta Publications
Total Pages: 484
Release: 2011-07-07
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781847084521

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This “absorbing history of the Ordnance Survey”—the first complete map of the British Isles—"charts the many hurdles map-makers have had to overcome” (The Guardian, UK). Map of a Nation tells the story of the creation of the Ordnance Survey map, the first complete, accurate, affordable map of the British Isles. The Ordnance Survey is a much beloved British institution, and this is—amazingly—the first popular history to tell the story of the map and the men who dreamt and delivered it. The Ordnance Survey’s history is one of political revolutions, rebellions and regional unions that altered the shape and identity of the United Kingdom over the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It’s also a deliciously readable account of one of the great untold British adventure stories, featuring intrepid individuals lugging brass theodolites up mountains to make the country visible to itself for the first time.

Mapping the Nation

Mapping the Nation
Author: Susan Schulten
Publsiher: University of Chicago Press
Total Pages: 258
Release: 2012-06-29
Genre: Technology & Engineering
ISBN: 9780226740706

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“A compelling read” that reveals how maps became informational tools charting everything from epidemics to slavery (Journal of American History). In the nineteenth century, Americans began to use maps in radically new ways. For the first time, medical men mapped diseases to understand and prevent epidemics, natural scientists mapped climate and rainfall to uncover weather patterns, educators mapped the past to foster national loyalty among students, and Northerners mapped slavery to assess the power of the South. After the Civil War, federal agencies embraced statistical and thematic mapping in order to profile the ethnic, racial, economic, moral, and physical attributes of a reunified nation. By the end of the century, Congress had authorized a national archive of maps, an explicit recognition that old maps were not relics to be discarded but unique records of the nation’s past. All of these experiments involved the realization that maps were not just illustrations of data, but visual tools that were uniquely equipped to convey complex ideas and information. In Mapping the Nation, Susan Schulten charts how maps of epidemic disease, slavery, census statistics, the environment, and the past demonstrated the analytical potential of cartography, and in the process transformed the very meaning of a map. Today, statistical and thematic maps are so ubiquitous that we take for granted that data will be arranged cartographically. Whether for urban planning, public health, marketing, or political strategy, maps have become everyday tools of social organization, governance, and economics. The world we inhabit—saturated with maps and graphic information—grew out of this sea change in spatial thought and representation in the nineteenth century, when Americans learned to see themselves and their nation in new dimensions.

Map of a Nation

Map of a Nation
Author: Rachel Hewitt
Publsiher: Granta Books
Total Pages: 436
Release: 2011
Genre: History
ISBN: 1847082548

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The fascinating story of the creation of the Ordnance Survey map, told for the first time by a brilliant young historian.

Decolonizing the Map

Decolonizing the Map
Author: James R. Akerman
Publsiher: University of Chicago Press
Total Pages: 392
Release: 2017-06-16
Genre: Technology & Engineering
ISBN: 9780226422817

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Almost universally, newly independent states seek to affirm their independence and identity by making the production of new maps and atlases a top priority. For formerly colonized peoples, however, this process neither begins nor ends with independence, and it is rarely straightforward. Mapping their own land is fraught with a fresh set of issues: how to define and administer their territories, develop their national identity, establish their role in the community of nations, and more. The contributors to Decolonizing the Map explore this complicated relationship between mapping and decolonization while engaging with recent theoretical debates about the nature of decolonization itself. These essays, originally delivered as the 2010 Kenneth Nebenzahl, Jr., Lectures in the History of Cartography at the Newberry Library, encompass more than two centuries and three continents—Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Ranging from the late eighteenth century through the mid-twentieth, contributors study topics from mapping and national identity in late colonial Mexico to the enduring complications created by the partition of British India and the racialized organization of space in apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa. A vital contribution to studies of both colonization and cartography, Decolonizing the Map is the first book to systematically and comprehensively examine the engagement of mapping in the long—and clearly unfinished—parallel processes of decolonization and nation building in the modern world.

The Nation on No Map Black Anarchism and Abolition

The Nation on No Map  Black Anarchism and Abolition
Author: William C. Anderson
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 120
Release: 2021-11-09
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 1849354340

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A call for Black survival in the face of genocide and catastrophe.

The Goddess and the Nation

The Goddess and the Nation
Author: Sumathi Ramaswamy
Publsiher: Duke University Press
Total Pages: 400
Release: 2009-01-01
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780822391531

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Making the case for a new kind of visual history, The Goddess and the Nation charts the pictorial life and career of Bharat Mata, “Mother India,” the Indian nation imagined as mother/goddess, embodiment of national territory, and unifying symbol for the country’s diverse communities. Soon after Mother India’s emergence in the late nineteenth century, artists, both famous and amateur, began to picture her in various media, incorporating the map of India into her visual persona. The images they produced enabled patriotic men and women in a heterogeneous population to collectively visualize India, affectively identify with it, and even become willing to surrender their lives for it. Filled with illustrations, including 100 in color, The Goddess and the Nation draws on visual studies, gender studies, and the history of cartography to offer a rigorous analysis of Mother India’s appearance in painting, print, poster art, and pictures from the late nineteenth century to the present. By exploring the mutual entanglement of the scientifically mapped image of India and a (Hindu) mother/goddess, Sumathi Ramaswamy reveals Mother India as a figure who relies on the British colonial mapped image of her dominion to distinguish her from the other goddesses of India, and to guarantee her novel status as embodiment, sign, and symbol of national territory. Providing an exemplary critique of ideologies of gender and the science of cartography, Ramaswamy demonstrates that images do not merely reflect history; they actively make it. In The Goddess and the Nation, she teaches us about pictorial ways of learning the form of the nation, of how to live with it—and ultimately to die for it.

Scotland

Scotland
Author: Christopher Fleet,Margaret Wilkes,Charles W. J. Withers
Publsiher: Birlinn Limited
Total Pages: 318
Release: 2012
Genre: History
ISBN: 1780270917

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Whilst documents and other written material are obvious resources that help shape our view of the past, maps too can say much about a nation's history. This is the first book to take maps seriously as a form of history, from the earliest representations of Scotland by Ptolemy in the second century AD to the most recent form of Scotland's mapping and geographical representation in GIS, satellite imagery and SATNAV.Compiled by three experts who have spent their lives working with maps, Scotland: Mapping the Nation offers a fascinating and thought-provoking perspective on Scottish history which is beautifully illustrated with complete facsimiles and details of hundreds of the most significant manuscript and printed maps from the National Library of Scotland and other institutions, including those by Timothy Pont, Joan Blaeu and William Roy, amongst many others.

Mapping the Nation

Mapping the Nation
Author: Esri
Publsiher: Mapping the Nation
Total Pages: 165
Release: 2019-02-05
Genre: Reference
ISBN: 1589485521

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An annual compilation of quality GIS work in the federal government, awakens officials to the potential of GIS.

A Map to the Door of No Return

A Map to the Door of No Return
Author: Dionne Brand
Publsiher: Vintage Canada
Total Pages: 240
Release: 2012-08-07
Genre: Biography & Autobiography
ISBN: 9780385674836

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A Map to the Door of No Return is a timely book that explores the relevance and nature of identity and belonging in a culturally diverse and rapidly changing world. It is an insightful, sensitive and poetic book of discovery. Drawing on cartography, travels, narratives of childhood in the Caribbean, journeys across the Canadian landscape, African ancestry, histories, politics, philosophies and literature, Dionne Brand sketches the shifting borders of home and nation, the connection to place in Canada and the world beyond. The title, A Map to the Door of No Return, refers to both a place in imagination and a point in history -- the Middle Passage. The quest for identity and place has profound meaning and resonance in an age of heterogenous identities. In this exquisitely written and thought-provoking new work, Dionne Brand creates a map of her own art.

From Treaty Peoples to Treaty Nation

From Treaty Peoples to Treaty Nation
Author: Greg Poelzer,Ken S. Coates
Publsiher: UBC Press
Total Pages: 366
Release: 2015-07-28
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9780774827560

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Canada is a country founded on relationships and agreements between Indigenous people and newcomers. Although recent court cases have strengthened Aboriginal rights, the cooperative spirit of the treaties is being lost as Canadians engage in endless arguments about First Nations “issues.” Greg Poelzer and Ken Coates breathe new life into these debates by looking at approaches that have failed and succeeded in the past and offering all Canadians – from policy makers to concerned citizens – realistic steps forward. The road ahead is clear: if all Canadians take up their responsibilities as treaty peoples, Canada will become a leader among treaty nations

Siam Mapped

Siam Mapped
Author: Thongchai Winichakul
Publsiher: University of Hawaii Press
Total Pages: 280
Release: 1997-06-30
Genre: History
ISBN: 0824819748

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This study of nationhood explores the 19th-century confrontation of ideas that transformed the kingdom of Siam into the modern conception of a nation. Siam Mapped demonstrates that the physical and political definition of Thailand on which other works are based is anachronistic.

A History of America in 100 Maps

A History of America in 100 Maps
Author: Susan Schulten
Publsiher: University of Chicago Press
Total Pages: 256
Release: 2018-09-21
Genre: Technology & Engineering
ISBN: 9780226458618

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Throughout its history, America has been defined through maps. Whether made for military strategy or urban reform, to encourage settlement or to investigate disease, maps invest information with meaning by translating it into visual form. They capture what people knew, what they thought they knew, what they hoped for, and what they feared. As such they offer unrivaled windows onto the past. In this book Susan Schulten uses maps to explore five centuries of American history, from the voyages of European discovery to the digital age. With stunning visual clarity, A History of America in 100 Maps showcases the power of cartography to illuminate and complicate our understanding of the past. Gathered primarily from the British Library’s incomparable archives and compiled into nine chronological chapters, these one hundred full-color maps range from the iconic to the unfamiliar. Each is discussed in terms of its specific features as well as its larger historical significance in a way that conveys a fresh perspective on the past. Some of these maps were made by established cartographers, while others were made by unknown individuals such as Cherokee tribal leaders, soldiers on the front, and the first generation of girls to be formally educated. Some were tools of statecraft and diplomacy, and others were instruments of social reform or even advertising and entertainment. But when considered together, they demonstrate the many ways that maps both reflect and influence historical change. Audacious in scope and charming in execution, this collection of one hundred full-color maps offers an imaginative and visually engaging tour of American history that will show readers a new way of navigating their own worlds.

Mapping Our Nation

Mapping Our Nation
Author: Sandy Phan
Publsiher: Shell Education Pub
Total Pages: 32
Release: 2013-10-30
Genre: Education
ISBN: 1480726362

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Readers learn about the different areas of the United States in this stimulating library bound book. Featuring vividly colored examples of various maps, including physical, political, and thematic, this book will have readers engaged and inspired to learn more about the different parts of the U.S. and to create a map of their own!

A History of Canada in Ten Maps

A History of Canada in Ten Maps
Author: Adam Shoalts
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 384
Release: 2017-10-10
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780143194002

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Winner of the 2018 Louise de Kiriline Lawrence Award for Nonfiction Longlisted for the 2018 RBC Taylor Prize Shortlisted for the 2018 Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction The sweeping, epic story of the mysterious land that came to be called “Canada” like it’s never been told before. Every map tells a story. And every map has a purpose--it invites us to go somewhere we've never been. It’s an account of what we know, but also a trace of what we long for. Ten Maps conjures the world as it appeared to those who were called upon to map it. What would the new world look like to wandering Vikings, who thought they had drifted into a land of mythical creatures, or Samuel de Champlain, who had no idea of the vastness of the landmass just beyond the treeline? Adam Shoalts, one of Canada’s foremost explorers, tells the stories behind these centuries old maps, and how they came to shape what became “Canada.” It’s a story that will surprise readers, and reveal the Canada we never knew was hidden. It brings to life the characters and the bloody disputes that forged our history, by showing us what the world looked like before it entered the history books. Combining storytelling, cartography, geography, archaeology and of course history, this book shows us Canada in a way we've never seen it before.

Under the Map of Germany

Under the Map of Germany
Author: Guntram Henrik Herb
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 264
Release: 2002-06-01
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9781134797905

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At the close of the First World War, propaganda mapping played a crucial role in the creation of a consensus about German national territory. Under the Map of Germany provides a detailed and vivid analysis of the history and techniques of nationalist mapping in inter-war Germany. Using extensive archival documentation - including many previously undiscovered maps - the author charts the development of new concepts of national territory and the establishment of an effective propaganda mapping network. His research demonstrates that a consensus about the extent of the Greater German nation was not created by skillful Nazi propagandists, but by the collaborate efforts of respected scholars and nationalist activists during the Weimar Republic. Challenging the belief that national self-determination is a just cause, Under the Map of Germany reveals that national territories are not tangible entities that can be clearly delimited, but are artificial constructs open to a wide range of interpretations.