Power Concedes Nothing

Power Concedes Nothing
Author: Linda Burnham,Max Elbaum,Maria Poblet
Publsiher: OR Books
Total Pages: 300
Release: 2022-09-20
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 1682193306

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The November 2020 US election was arguably the most consequential since the 1860 election of Abraham Lincoln--and grassroots leaders and organizers played crucial roles in the contention for the presidency and control of both houses of Congress. Power Concedes Nothing tells the stories behind a victory that won both the White House and the Senate and powered progressive candidates to new levels of influence. It describes the on-the-ground efforts that mobilized a record-breaking turnout by registering new voters and motivating an electorate both old and new. In doing so it charts a viable path to victory for the vital contests upcoming in 2022 and 2024. Contributors include: Cliff Albright, Yong Jung Cho, Larry Cohen, Sendolo Diaminah, Neidi Dominguez, David Duhalde, Alicia Garza, Ryan Greenwood, Arisha Michelle Hatch , Jon Liss, Thenjiwe McHarris, Andrea Cristina Mercado, Maurice Mitchell, Rafael Návar, Deepak Pateriya, Ai-jen Poo, W. Mondale Robinson, Art Reyes III, Nsé Ufot and Mario Yedidia

Power Concedes Nothing

Power Concedes Nothing
Author: Connie Rice
Publsiher: Simon and Schuster
Total Pages: 355
Release: 2014-02-11
Genre: Biography & Autobiography
ISBN: 9781416544739

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An influential civil rights attorney and second cousin to former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice describes the family beliefs and achievements that inspired her career, recounting her dedication to civil rights causes in areas ranging from transportation and education to the death penalty and the LAPD.

Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass
Author: Philip S. Foner,Yuval Taylor
Publsiher: Chicago Review Press
Total Pages: 808
Release: 2000-04-01
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781613741474

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One of the greatest African American leaders and one of the most brilliant minds of his time, Frederick Douglass spoke and wrote with unsurpassed eloquence on almost all the major issues confronting the American people during his life—from the abolition of slavery to women's rights, from the Civil War to lynching, from American patriotism to black nationalism. Between 1950 and 1975, Philip S. Foner collected the most important of Douglass's hundreds of speeches, letters, articles, and editorials into an impressive five-volume set, now long out of print. Abridged and condensed into one volume, and supplemented with several important texts that Foner did not include, this compendium presents the most significant, insightful, and elegant short works of Douglass's massive oeuvre.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
Author: FREDERICK DOUGLASS
Publsiher: BEYOND BOOKS HUB
Total Pages: 129
Release: 101-01-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography
ISBN: 9182736450XXX

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Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass First published in 1845, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass is an eye-opening depiction of American slavery. Part autobiography, part human-rights treatise, it describes the everyday horrors inflicted on captive laborers, as well as the strength and courage needed to survive. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Born into slavery on a Maryland plantation in 1818, Frederick Douglass spent years secretly teaching himself to read and write—a crime for which he risked life and limb. After two failed escapes, Douglass finally, blessedly boarded a train in 1838 that would eventually lead him to New York City and freedom. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Few books have done more to change America’s notion of African Americans than this seminal work. Beyond its historical and social relevancy, it is admired today for its gripping stories, the intensity of spirit, and heartfelt humanity. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Born into a life of bondage, Frederick Douglass secretly taught himself to read and write. It was a crime punishable by death, but it resulted in one of the most eloquent indictments of slavery ever recorded. His gripping narrative takes us into the fields, cabins, and manors of pre–Civil War plantations in the South and reveals the daily terrors he suffered. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass Written more than a century and a half ago by a Black man who went on to become a famous orator, U.S. minister to Haiti, and leader of his people, this timeless classic still speaks directly to our age. It is a record of savagery and inhumanity that goes far to explain why America still suffers from the great injustices of the past. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass
Author: David W. Blight
Publsiher: Simon & Schuster
Total Pages: 912
Release: 2020-01-07
Genre: Biography & Autobiography
ISBN: 9781416590323

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**Winner of the Pulitzer Prize in History** “Extraordinary…a great American biography” (The New Yorker) of the most important African-American of the nineteenth century: Frederick Douglass, the escaped slave who became the greatest orator of his day and one of the leading abolitionists and writers of the era. As a young man Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) escaped from slavery in Baltimore, Maryland. He was fortunate to have been taught to read by his slave owner mistress, and he would go on to become one of the major literary figures of his time. His very existence gave the lie to slave owners: with dignity and great intelligence he bore witness to the brutality of slavery. Initially mentored by William Lloyd Garrison, Douglass spoke widely, using his own story to condemn slavery. By the Civil War, Douglass had become the most famed and widely travelled orator in the nation. In his unique and eloquent voice, written and spoken, Douglass was a fierce critic of the United States as well as a radical patriot. After the war he sometimes argued politically with younger African Americans, but he never forsook either the Republican party or the cause of black civil and political rights. In this “cinematic and deeply engaging” (The New York Times Book Review) biography, David Blight has drawn on new information held in a private collection that few other historian have consulted, as well as recently discovered issues of Douglass’s newspapers. “Absorbing and even moving…a brilliant book that speaks to our own time as well as Douglass’s” (The Wall Street Journal), Blight’s biography tells the fascinating story of Douglass’s two marriages and his complex extended family. “David Blight has written the definitive biography of Frederick Douglass…a powerful portrait of one of the most important American voices of the nineteenth century” (The Boston Globe). In addition to the Pulitzer Prize, Frederick Douglass won the Bancroft, Parkman, Los Angeles Times (biography), Lincoln, Plutarch, and Christopher awards and was named one of the Best Books of 2018 by The New York Times Book Review, The Wall Street Journal, The Boston Globe, The Chicago Tribune, The San Francisco Chronicle, and Time.

Race And Ethnic Conflict

Race And Ethnic Conflict
Author: Fred L Pincus
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 484
Release: 2019-04-18
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9780429977527

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In the revised and updated second edition of this comprehensive book, the first anthology to integrate social-psychological literature on prejudice with sociological and historical investigations, contributors introduce readers to the key debates and principal writings on racial and ethnic conflict, representing conservative, liberal, and radical p

Reclaiming Dissent

Reclaiming Dissent
Author: Mordechai Gordon
Publsiher: Sense Pub
Total Pages: 168
Release: 2009
Genre: Education
ISBN: 9087908849

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Reclaiming Dissent is a unique collection of essays that focus on the value of dissent for the survival of democracy in the United States and the role that education can play with respect to this virtue. The various contributors to this volume share the conviction that the vitality of a democracy depends on the ability of ordinary citizens to debate and oppose the decisions of their government. Yet recent history in the United States suggests that dissent is discouraged and even suppressed in the political, cultural and educational arenas. Many Americans are not even aware that democracy is not primarily about voting every four years or majority rule, but about actively participating in public debates and civic action. This book makes a strong case for the need to reclaim a tradition in the United States, like the one that existed during the Civil Rights Era, in which dissent, opposition, and conflict were part of the daily fabric of our democracy. Teacher educators, teacher candidates, new teachers, and educators in general can greatly benefit from reading this book.

Unsung

Unsung
Author: Schomburg Center,Michelle D. Commander
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 656
Release: 2021-02-16
Genre: Literary Collections
ISBN: 9780525507697

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A new historical anthology from transatlantic slavery to the Reconstruction curated by the Schomburg Center, that makes the case for focusing on the histories of Black people as agents and architects of their own lives and ultimate liberation, with a foreword by Kevin Young This is the first Penguin Classics anthology published in partnership with the Schomburg Center, a world-renowned cultural institution documenting black life in America and worldwide. A historic branch of NYPL located in Harlem, the Schomburg holds one of the world's premiere collections of slavery material within the Lapidus Center for Historical Analysis of Transatlantic Slavery. Unsung will place well-known documents by abolitionists alongside lesser-known life stories and overlooked or previously uncelebrated accounts of the everyday lives and activism that were central in the slavery era, but that are mostly excised from today's master accounts. Unsung will also highlight related titles from founder Arturo Schomburg's initial collection: rare histories and first-person narratives about slavery that assisted his generation in understanding the roots of their contemporary social struggles. Unsung will draw from the Schomburg's rich holdings in order to lead a dynamic discussion of slavery, rebellion, resistance, and anti-slavery protest in the United States.

No Struggle No Progress

No Struggle  No Progress
Author: Howard Fuller,Lisa Frazier Page
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 306
Release: 2014-09
Genre: Biography & Autobiography
ISBN: 1626000441

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This book tells the story of one mans life journey in the heart of the struggle to reform the nation's schools. Fuller has always believed that it is important for poor and working class Black people to gain access to the levers of power dictating their lives. He believes that those of us who are educated and resourceful have a moral and historical responsibility to help them, and that is what he has always tried to do. Early in his life he found truth in the words of the great Frederick Douglass: “Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did, and it never will.” “So struggle we must” says Fuller. That understanding of the relationship between struggle and progress is what propelled him down dark alleys and dirt roads in some of North Carolina's poorest communities in the 1960s and pushed him into the bush, mountains, and war-torn villages of Africa nearly a decade later.“It is what pushes me still in the fight over one of the most contentious education issues of this era: parental choice. I believe deep in my heart that giving low-income and working class parents the power (and the money) to make choices about the schools their children attend will not only revolutionize education but provide the compass to a better life for the many poor, Black children stuck in failing systems. … Education reform is one of the most crucial social justice issues of our time, and I will spend the rest of my days fighting for my people, most especially those without the power or the resources to fight for themselves.”

Resistance to Tyranny

Resistance to Tyranny
Author: Joseph P. Martino
Publsiher: Createspace Independent Pub
Total Pages: 431
Release: 2010-04-24
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 1450574289

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This book is a primer on armed resistance to tyranny. It is intended to answer questions the reader might not think of asking, and to direct the reader to sources of more detailed information. Topics covered include justifying revolt, conditions for success, possible government responses, strategy & tactics, the overt and covert organizations, weapons, equipment, survival skills, land navigation, camouflage, boobytraps, weapons caching, training, secure camps, safe houses, communications, encryption & codes, gaining public support, sniping, sabotage, raids, intelligence and counter-intelligence. It is intended for scholarly information purposes only.

River of Fire

River of Fire
Author: Helen Prejean
Publsiher: Vintage
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2020-08-25
Genre: Biography & Autobiography
ISBN: 9780307389039

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"Sister Helen Prejean's stirring spiritual journey is less widely known than her work as the nation's foremost leader in efforts to abolish the death penalty and as an activist nun. In her fiercely honest and moving account of her formative years, Sister Helen tells of an awakening that shattered her insulated life as a nun. In inner-city New Orleans of the 1980s, she learned about her neighbors' daily struggle against racism and recognized her own white privilege. This awakening catapulted her into abolitionist mission and toward a faith that fuels and sustains her work for human rights to this day. Along the way, she navigated close friendships, including one with a priest intent on marrying her, who challenged her vocation in 'the new territory of the heart.' Written in lighthearted, luminous prose, River of Fire captures how one woman, set on a life of prayer and teaching, was summoned from passive obedience and dreamy ideas of a better world to fierce intellectual critique of society. Sister Helen's story will galvanize those who are likewise seeking to lead a passionate and spiritual life that is wide awake to the struggles and creative opportunities of our world." -- From back cover.

The Locust Effect

The Locust Effect
Author: Gary A. Haugen,Victor Boutros
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 384
Release: 2015-03-17
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9780190229269

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An urgent call-to-action in support of ending violence against the world's poor reveals how in addition to hunger and disease, impoverish populations have become increasingly subject to assault, forced labor and other physical abuses, outlining recommendations for implementing workable solutions and overcoming corruption.

Revolution in the Air

Revolution in the Air
Author: Max Elbaum
Publsiher: Verso Books
Total Pages: 416
Release: 2018-04-10
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781786634580

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The first in-depth study of the long march of the US New Left after 1968 The sixties were a time when radical movements learned to embrace twentieth-century Marxism. Revolution in the Air is the definitive study of this turning point, and examines what the resistance of today can learn from the legacies of Lenin, Mao and Che. It tells the story of the “new communist movement” which was the most racially integrated and fast-growing movement on the Left. Thousands of young activists, radicalized by the Vietnam War and Black Liberation, and spurred on by the Puerto Rican, Chicano and Asian-American movements, embraced a Third World oriented version of Marxism. These admirers of Mao, Che and Amilcar Cabral organized resistance to the Republican majorities of Nixon and Ford. By the 1980s these groups had either collapsed or become tiny shards of the dream of a Maoist world revolution. Taking issue with the idea of a division between an early “good sixties” and a later “bad sixties,” Max Elbaum is particularly concerned to reclaim the lessons of the new communist movement for today’s activists who, like their sixties’ predecessors, are coming of age at a time when the Left lacks mass support and is fragmented along racial lines. With a new foreward by Alicia Garza, cofounder of #BlackLivesMatter.

A Slave No More

A Slave No More
Author: David W. Blight
Publsiher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Total Pages: 315
Release: 2009
Genre: Biography & Autobiography
ISBN: 0156034514

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Two slave narratives that document the experiences of runaway slaves who managed to reach the protection of Union forces are accompanied by biographies of both men that reconstruct their childhoods, escape, Civil War service, and successful later lives.

Unapologetic

Unapologetic
Author: Charlene Carruthers
Publsiher: Beacon Press
Total Pages: 192
Release: 2018-08-28
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9780807019412

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A manifesto from one of America's most influential activists which disrupts political, economic, and social norms by reimagining the Black Radical Tradition. Drawing on Black intellectual and grassroots organizing traditions, including the Haitian Revolution, the US civil rights movement, and LGBTQ rights and feminist movements, Unapologetic challenges all of us engaged in the social justice struggle to make the movement for Black liberation more radical, more queer, and more feminist. This book provides a vision for how social justice movements can become sharper and more effective through principled struggle, healing justice, and leadership development. It also offers a flexible model of what deeply effective organizing can be, anchored in the Chicago model of activism, which features long-term commitment, cultural sensitivity, creative strategizing, and multiple cross-group alliances. And Unapologetic provides a clear framework for activists committed to building transformative power, encouraging young people to see themselves as visionaries and leaders.