Queering Kansas City Jazz

Queering Kansas City Jazz
Author: Amber R. Clifford-Napoleone
Publsiher: University of Nebraska Press
Total Pages: 234
Release: 2018-11-01
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9780803262911

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The Jazz Age, a phenomenon that shaped American leisure culture in the early twentieth century, coincided with the growth of Kansas City, Missouri, from frontier town to metropolitan city. Though Kansas City’s music, culture, and stars are well covered, Queering Kansas City Jazz supplements the grand narrative of jazz history by including queer identities in the city’s history while framing the jazz-scene experience in terms of identity and space. Cabarets, gender impressionism clubs, and sites of sex tourism in Kansas City served as world-making spaces for those whose performance of identity transgressed hegemonic notions of gender, sexuality, race, and class. Amber R. Clifford-Napoleone takes an interdisciplinary approach to provide a critical deconstruction of how the jazz scene offered a space for nonnormative gender practice and performance and acted as a site of contested identity and spatial territory. Few books examine the changing ideas about gender in the turn-of-the-century Great Plains, under the false assumption that people in middle-American places experienced cultural shifts only as an aftershock of events on the coasts. This approach overlooks the region’s contested territories, identities, and memories and fails to adequately explain the social and cultural disruptions experienced on the plains. Clifford-Napoleone rectifies this oversight and shows how Kansas City represents the complexity of the jazz scene in America as a microcosm of all the other people who made the culture, clubs, music, and cabarets of the age possible.

Queering the Inferno

Queering the Inferno
Author: Amber R. Clifford-Napoleone
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 323
Release: 2007
Genre: Gays
ISBN: OCLC:819546068

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The music later called "jazz" flourished in Kansas City from the 1890s until the end of World War II, when city boss Tom Pendergast's patronage of jazz clubs ended with his incarceration for tax evasion. The city was home to a wide array of clubs, cabarets and performers from every corner of America. As a railroad terminus, the jazz scene in Kansas City was the last stop on performance circuits such as the Theatre Owner's Booking Association (TOBA). While famous people and events of the jazz scene remain in popular memory, many other important aspects of the complex jazz scene were silenced by the grand narrative of jazz history. What about the lives and experiences of brothel madams, drag performers, table dancers, and other citizens who do not appear in the written history of Kansas City jazz? This dissertation will attempt to excavate the lived experience of those Kansas City jazz scene citizens through an analysis of its geography of desires. Geography of desires is an attempt to understand the complexity of life in Kansas City's jazz scene in spatial terms. It is also an approach intended to answer an important question: did citizens who considered themselves marginalized in the Kansas City jazz scene engage in what Jose Esteban Munoz termed "worldmaking" in spaces they identified as "theirs?" Through the geography of desires, I theorize that cabarets, drag clubs and brothels in Kansas City also served as worldmaking spaces. In order to explore the role that jazz scene spaces played in worldmaking, this work attempts an intersectional analysis of the performance of gender, sexuality, class and race in Kansas City. The first chapter focuses on the theoretical underpinnings of the geography of desires approach. The second chapter examines the grand narrative of jazz history as it represents Kansas City. The third chapter explores the intersections of identity in the Pendergast machine. Gender transgression in the jazz scene is the focus of the fourth chapter. Prostitution and sex tourism are the center of chapter four. Finally, chapter five investigates the life of table singer Edna Mae Jacobs.

Historical Dictionary of Jazz

Historical Dictionary of Jazz
Author: John S. Davis
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Total Pages: 558
Release: 2020-11-15
Genre: Music
ISBN: 9781538128152

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Jazz is a music born in the United States and formed by a combination of influences. In its infancy, jazz was a melting pot of military brass bands, work songs and field hollers of the United States slaves during the 19th century, European harmonies and forms, and the rhythms of Africa and the Caribbean. Later, the blues and the influence of Spanish and French Creoles with European classical training nudged jazz further along in its development. As it moved through the swing era of the 1930s, bebop of the 1940s, and cool jazz of the 1950s, jazz continued to serve as a reflection of societal changes. During the turbulent 1960s, freedom and unrest were expressed through Free Jazz and the Avant Garde. Popular and world music have been incorporated and continue to expand the impact and reach of jazz. Today, jazz is truly an international art form. This second edition of Historical Dictionary of Jazz contains a chronology, an introduction, and an extensive bibliography. The dictionary section has over 1,500 cross-referenced entries on musicians, styles of jazz, instruments, recording labels, bands and bandleaders, and more. This book is an excellent resource for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Jazz.

Storied Scandalous Kansas City

Storied   Scandalous Kansas City
Author: Karla Deel
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield
Total Pages: 168
Release: 2019-11-01
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781493042449

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Welcome to Kansas City—the best town this side of Hell. The Paris of the Plains. Home to the Wettest Block in the World. This collection celebrates a storied history of one notorious city. Meet the mobsters and victims, bootleggers, madams, political bosses and raucous entertainers who truly brought the party to the plains even during Prohibition. Witness the best parades, the wackiest costumes and the wildest scams. Kansas City’s sordid underbelly is full of surprises sure to delight and entice—the odd, macabre and delightful.

Nepantla Squared

Nepantla Squared
Author: Linda Heidenreich
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 228
Release: 2020
Genre: Feminist theory
ISBN: 9781496213402

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Nepantla Squared maps the lives of two transgender mestiz@s to chart the ways race, gender, sex, ethnicity, and capital function differently in different times. Linda Heidenreich coins the term nepantla2 to mark figures who moved between cultures and genders.

Staging Family

Staging Family
Author: Nan Mullenneaux
Publsiher: University of Nebraska Press
Total Pages: 462
Release: 2018-12-01
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781496210913

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Breaking every prescription of ideal femininity, American actresses of the mid-nineteenth century appeared in public alongside men, financially supported nuclear and extended families, challenged domestic common law, and traveled the globe in the transnational theater market. While these women expanded professional, artistic, and geographic frontiers, they expanded domestic frontiers as well: publicly, actresses used the traditional rhetoric of domesticity to mask their very nontraditional personal lives, instigating historically significant domestic innovations to circumvent the gender constraints of the mid-nineteenth century, reinventing themselves and their families in the process. Nan Mullenneaux focuses on the personal and professional lives of more than sixty women who, despite their diverse backgrounds, each made complex conscious and unconscious compromises to create profit and power. Mullenneaux identifies patterns of macro and micro negotiation and reinvention and maps them onto the waves of legal, economic, and social change to identify broader historical links that complicate notions of the influence of gendered power and the definition of feminism; the role of the body/embodiment in race, class, and gender issues; the relevance of family history to the achievements of influential Americans; and national versus inter- and transnational cultural trends. While Staging Family expands our understanding of how nineteenth-century actresses both negotiated power and then hid that power, it also informs contemporary questions of how women juggle professional and personal responsibilities—achieving success in spite of gender constraints and societal expectations.

Jazz and Justice

Jazz and Justice
Author: Gerald Horne
Publsiher: Monthly Review Press
Total Pages: 512
Release: 2019-06-18
Genre: Music
ISBN: 9781583677865

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A galvanizing history of how jazz and jazz musicians flourished despite rampant cultural exploitation The music we call “jazz” arose in late nineteenth century North America—most likely in New Orleans—based on the musical traditions of Africans, newly freed from slavery. Grounded in the music known as the “blues,” which expressed the pain, sufferings, and hopes of Black folk then pulverized by Jim Crow, this new music entered the world via the instruments that had been abandoned by departing military bands after the Civil War. Jazz and Justice examines the economic, social, and political forces that shaped this music into a phenomenal US—and Black American—contribution to global arts and culture. Horne assembles a galvanic story depicting what may have been the era’s most virulent economic—and racist—exploitation, as jazz musicians battled organized crime, the Ku Klux Klan, and other variously malignant forces dominating the nightclub scene where jazz became known. Horne pays particular attention to women artists, such as pianist Mary Lou Williams and trombonist Melba Liston, and limns the contributions of musicians with Native American roots. This is the story of a beautiful lotus, growing from the filth of the crassest form of human immiseration.

Queer Embodiment

Queer Embodiment
Author: Hil Malatino
Publsiher: U of Nebraska Press
Total Pages: 264
Release: 2021-11
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9781496229076

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Merging critical theory, autobiography, and sexological archival research, Hil Malatino explores how and why intersexuality became an anomalous embodiment requiring correction and how contesting this pathologization can promote medical reform and human rights for intersex and trans people.

Jazzing

Jazzing
Author: Thomas H. Greenland
Publsiher: University of Illinois Press
Total Pages: 272
Release: 2016-05-15
Genre: Music
ISBN: 9780252098314

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How do we speak about jazz? In this provocative study based on the author's deep immersion in the New York City jazz scene, Tom Greenland turns from the usual emphasis on artists and their music to focus on non-performing participants, describing them as active performers in their own right who witness and thus collaborate in a happening made one-of-a-kind by improvisation, mood, and moment. Jazzing shines a spotlight on the constituency of proprietors, booking agents, photographers, critics, publicists, painters, amateur musicians, fans, friends, and tourists that makes up New York City's contemporary jazz scene. Drawn from deep ethnographic research, interviews, and long term participant observation, Jazzing charts the ways New York's distinctive physical and social-cultural environment affects and is affected by jazz. Throughout, Greenland offers a passionate argument in favor of a radically inclusive conception of music-making, one in which individuals collectively improvise across social contexts to co-create community and musical meaning. An odyssey through the clubs and other performance spaces on and off the beaten track, Jazzing is an insider's view of a vibrant urban art world.

The Queer Encyclopedia of Music Dance and Musical Theater

The Queer Encyclopedia of Music  Dance  and Musical Theater
Author: Claude Summers
Publsiher: Cleis Press Start
Total Pages: 400
Release: 2012-04-24
Genre: Performing Arts
ISBN: 9781573448758

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Aficionados of music, dance, opera, and musical theater will relish this volume featuring over 200 articles showcasing composers, singers, musicians, dancers, and choreographers across eras and styles. Read about Hildegard of Bingen, whose Symphonia expressed both spiritual and physical desire for the Virgin Mary, and George Frideric Handel, who not only created roles for castrati but was behind the Venetian opera's preoccupations with gender ambiguity. Discover Alban Berg’s Lulu, opera’s first openly lesbian character. And don’t forget Kiss Me Kate, the hit 1948 Broadway musical: written by Cole Porter, married though openly gay; directed by John C. Wilson, Noël Coward's ex-lover; and featuring Harold Lang, who had affairs with Leonard Bernstein and Gore Vidal. No single volume has ever achieved the breadth of this scholarly yet eminently readable compendium. It includes overviews of genres as well as fascinating biographical entries on hundreds of figures such as Peter Tchaikovsky, Maurice Ravel, Sergei Diaghilev, Bessie Smith, Aaron Copland, Stephen Sondheim, Alvin Ailey, Rufus Wainwright, and Ani DiFranco.

Gothic Queer Culture

Gothic Queer Culture
Author: Laura Westengard
Publsiher: U of Nebraska Press
Total Pages: 300
Release: 2019-10-01
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9781496217448

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In Gothic Queer Culture, Laura Westengard proposes that contemporary U.S. queer culture is gothic at its core. Using interdisciplinary cultural studies to examine the gothicism in queer art, literature, and thought—including ghosts embedded in queer theory, shadowy crypts in lesbian pulp fiction, monstrosity and cannibalism in AIDS poetry, and sadomasochism in queer performance—Westengard argues that during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries a queer culture has emerged that challenges and responds to traumatic marginalization by creating a distinctly gothic aesthetic. Gothic Queer Culture examines the material effects of marginalization, exclusion, and violence and explains why discourse around the complexities of genders and sexualities repeatedly returns to the gothic. Westengard places this queer knowledge production within a larger framework of gothic queer culture, which inherently includes theoretical texts, art, literature, performance, and popular culture. By analyzing queer knowledge production alongside other forms of queer culture, Gothic Queer Culture enters into the most current conversations on the state of gender and sexuality, especially debates surrounding negativity, anti-relationalism, assimilation, and neoliberalism. It provides a framework for understanding these debates in the context of a distinctly gothic cultural mode that acknowledges violence and insidious trauma, depathologizes the association between trauma and queerness, and offers a rich counterhegemonic cultural aesthetic through the circulation of gothic tropes.

Queering Public Address

Queering Public Address
Author: Charles E. Morris
Publsiher: Univ of South Carolina Press
Total Pages: 298
Release: 2007
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines
ISBN: 1570036640

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Ten noted rhetorical critics disrupt the silence regarding nonnormative sexualities in the study of American historical discourse and upend the heteronormativity that governs much of rhetorical history. Enacting both political and radical visions, these scholars articulate the promises of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender public address. The contributors consider figures such as Abraham Lincoln, Eleanor Roosevelt, Harvey Milk, Marlon Riggs, and Lorraine Hansberry; and issues as diverse as collective identity, nineteenth-century semiotics of gender and sexuality, the sexual politics of the Harlem Renaissance, psychiatric productions of the queer, and violence-induced traumatic styles.

Transmovimientos

Transmovimientos
Author: Ellie D. Hernández,Eddy Francisco Alvarez, Jr.,Magda García
Publsiher: U of Nebraska Press
Total Pages: 258
Release: 2021-06
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781496227140

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Within a trans-embodied framework, this anthology identifies transmovimientos as the creative force or social mechanism through which queer, trans, and gender nonconforming Latinx communities navigate their location and calibrate their consciousness. This anthology unveils a critical perspective with the emphasis on queer, trans, and gender nonconforming communities of immigrants and social dissidents who reflect on and write about diaspora and migratory movements while navigating geographical and embodied spaces across gendered and racialized contexts, all crucial elements of the trans-movements taking place in the United States. This collection forms a nuanced conversation between scholarship and social activism that speaks in concrete ways about diasporic and migratory LGBTQ communities who suffer from immoral immigration policies and political discourses that produce untenable living situations. The focal point of analysis throughout Transmovimientos examines migratory movements and anti-immigrant sentiment, homophobia, and stigma toward people who are transgender, immigrants, and refugees. These deliberate consciousness-based expressions are designed to realign awareness about the body in transit and the diasporic experience of relocating and emerging into new possibilities.

Hybrid Anxieties

Hybrid Anxieties
Author: C. L. Quinan
Publsiher: U of Nebraska Press
Total Pages: 282
Release: 2020-12
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781496223593

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Situated at the crossroads of queer theory and postcolonial studies, Hybrid Anxieties analyzes the intertwined and composite aspects of identities and textual forms in the wake of the French-Algerian War (1954-1962). C. L. Quinan argues that the war precipitated a dynamic in which a contestation of hegemonic masculinity occurred alongside a production of queer modes of subjectivity, embodiment, and memory that subvert norms. Innovations in literature and cinema were also directly impacted by the long and difficult process of decolonization, as the war provoked a rethinking of politics and aesthetics. The novels, films, and poetry analyzed in Hybrid Anxieties trace this imbrication of content and form, demonstrating how a postwar fracturing had both salutary and injurious effects, not only on bodies and psyches but also on artistic forms. Adopting a queer postcolonial perspective, Hybrid Anxieties adds a new impulse to the question of how to rethink hegemonic notions of gender, sexuality, and nationality, thereby opening up new spaces for considering the redemptive and productive possibilities of negotiating life in a postcolonial context. Without losing sight of the trauma of this particularly violent chapter in history, Hybrid Anxieties proposes a new kind of hybridity that, however anxious and anticipatory, emphasizes the productive forces of a queer desire to deconstruct teleological relationships between past, present, and future.

Terrorizing Gender

Terrorizing Gender
Author: Mia Fischer
Publsiher: U of Nebraska Press
Total Pages: 282
Release: 2019-11
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9781496206749

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Using an interdisciplinary framework, Mia Fischer connects media coverage with state regulation of transgender people to show how, despite their increased visibility in national discourse, dominant representations of trans people as deceptive, deviant, and threatening are used to justify, even normalize, state-sanctioned violence against transgender communities.