Rise to Globalism

Rise to Globalism
Author: Stephen E. Ambrose
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 592
Release: 2010-12-22
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 9780142004944

Download Rise to Globalism Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Since it first appeared in 1971, Rise to Globalism has sold hundreds of thousands of copies. The ninth edition of this classic survey, now updated through the administration of George W. Bush, offers a concise and informative overview of the evolution of American foreign policy from 1938 to the present, focusing on such pivotal events as World War II, the Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam, and 9/11. Examining everything from the Iran-Contra scandal to the rise of international terrorism, the authors analyze-in light of the enormous global power of the United States-how American economic aggressiveness, racism, and fear of Communism have shaped the nation's evolving foreign policy.

Rise to Globalism

Rise to Globalism
Author: Stephen E. Ambrose
Publsiher: Viking Adult
Total Pages: 135
Release: 1975-06-30
Genre: Electronic Book
ISBN: 014061608X

Download Rise to Globalism Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

The Emergence of Globalism

The Emergence of Globalism
Author: Or Rosenboim
Publsiher: Princeton University Press
Total Pages: 352
Release: 2019-03-19
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780691191508

Download The Emergence of Globalism Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

During and after the Second World War, public intellectuals in Britain and the United States grappled with concerns about the future of democracy, the prospects of liberty, and the decline of the imperial system. Without using the term "globalization, " they identified a shift toward technological, economic, cultural, and political interconnectedness and developed a "globalist" ideology to reflect this new postwar reality. The Emergence of Globalism examines the competing visions of world order that shaped these debates and led to the development of globalism as a modern political concept. Shedding critical light on this neglected chapter in the history of political thought, Or Rosenboim describes how a transnational network of globalist thinkers emerged from the traumas of war and expatriation in the 1940s and how their ideas drew widely from political philosophy, geopolitics, economics, imperial thought, constitutional law, theology, and philosophy of science. She presents compelling portraits of Raymond Aron, Owen Lattimore, Lionel Robbins, Barbara Wootton, Friedrich Hayek, Lionel Curtis, Richard McKeon, Michael Polanyi, Lewis Mumford, Jacques Maritain, Reinhold Niebuhr, H.G. Wells, and others. Rosenboim shows how the globalist debate they embarked on sought to balance the tensions between a growing recognition of pluralism on the one hand and an appreciation of the unity of humankind on the other."--Dust jacket

The Collapse of Globalism

The Collapse of Globalism
Author: John Ralston Saul
Publsiher: Atlantic Books Ltd
Total Pages: 300
Release: 2018-01-04
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781848873155

Download The Collapse of Globalism Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Globalization is dead. Nation states are resurgent, international trade has enriched the few rather than the promised many, and democratic values are on the retreat. The shining-eyed optimism of more open, more equal societies has given way to demagoguery and nationalism. As the problems of immigration, extremism and the economy cause the world's nations to rethink their relationships, John Ralston Saul's brilliantly insightful The Collapse of Globalism lights the way to where we go from here.

Justice Globalism

Justice Globalism
Author: Manfred Steger,James Goodman,Erin K Wilson
Publsiher: SAGE
Total Pages: 184
Release: 2012-12-18
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 9781446271933

Download Justice Globalism Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Are political activists connected to the global justice movement simplistically opposed to neoliberal globalization? Is their political vision 'incoherent' and their policy proposals 'naïve' and 'superficial' as is often claimed by the mainstream media? Drawing on dozens of interviews and rich textual analyses involving nearly fifty global justice organizations linked to the World Social Forum, the authors of this pioneering study challenge this prevailing view. They present a compelling case that the global justice movement has actually fashioned a new political ideology with global reach: 'justice globalism'. Far from being incoherent, justice globalism possesses a rich and nuanced set of core concepts and powerful ideological claims. The book investigates how justice globalists respond to global financial crises, to escalating climate change, and to the global food crisis. It finds justice globalism generating new political agendas and campaigns to address these pressing problems. Justice globalism, the book concludes, has much to contribute to solving the serious global challenges of the 21st century. Justice Globalism will prove a stimulating read for undergraduate and graduate students in the social sciences and humanities who are taking courses on globalization, global studies and global justice.

Us vs Them

Us vs  Them
Author: Ian Bremmer
Publsiher: Penguin
Total Pages: 208
Release: 2018-04-24
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 9780525533191

Download Us vs Them Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

New York Times bestseller "A cogent analysis of the concurrent Trump/Brexit phenomena and a dire warning about what lies ahead...a lucid, provocative book." --Kirkus Reviews Those who championed globalization once promised a world of winners, one in which free trade would lift all the world's boats, and extremes of left and right would give way to universally embraced liberal values. The past few years have shattered this fantasy, as those who've paid the price for globalism's gains have turned to populist and nationalist politicians to express fury at the political, media, and corporate elites they blame for their losses. The United States elected an anti-immigration, protectionist president who promised to "put America first" and turned a cold eye on alliances and treaties. Across Europe, anti-establishment political parties made gains not seen in decades. The United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union. And as Ian Bremmer shows in this eye-opening book, populism is still spreading. Globalism creates plenty of both winners and losers, and those who've missed out want to set things right. They've seen their futures made obsolete. They hear new voices and see new faces all about them. They feel their cultures shift. They don't trust what they read. They've begun to understand the world as a battle for the future that pits "us" vs. "them." Bremmer points to the next wave of global populism, one that hits emerging nations before they have fully emerged. As in Europe and America, citizens want security and prosperity, and they're becoming increasingly frustrated with governments that aren't capable of providing them. To protect themselves, many government will build walls, both digital and physical. For instance... * In Brazil and other fast-developing countries, civilians riot when higher expectations for better government aren't being met--the downside of their own success in lifting millions from poverty. * In Mexico, South Africa, Turkey, Indonesia, Egypt and other emerging states, frustration with government is on the rise and political battle lines are being drawn. * In China, where awareness of inequality is on the rise, the state is building a system to use the data that citizens generate to contain future demand for change * In India, the tools now used to provide essential services for people who've never had them can one day be used to tighten the ruling party's grip on power. When human beings feel threatened, we identify the danger and look for allies. We use the enemy, real or imagined, to rally friends to our side. This book is about the ways in which people will define these threats as fights for survival. It's about the walls governments will build to protect insiders from outsiders and the state from its people. And it's about what we can do about it.

Globalists

Globalists
Author: Quinn Slobodian
Publsiher: Harvard University Press
Total Pages: 400
Release: 2020-04-07
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780674244849

Download Globalists Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Do neoliberals hate the state? In the first intellectual history of neoliberal globalism, Quinn Slobodian follows neoliberal thinkers from the Habsburg Empire’s fall to the creation of the World Trade Organization to show that neoliberalism emerged less to shrink government and abolish regulations than to deploy them globally to protect capitalism.

Rise to Globalism

Rise to Globalism
Author: Stephen E. Ambrose,Douglas Brinkley
Publsiher: Penguin (Non-Classics)
Total Pages: 464
Release: 1997
Genre: History
ISBN: 0140268316

Download Rise to Globalism Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Incorporating the most recent scholarship, this eighth revised edition of "Rise to Globalism" now in paperback offers a concise and informative overview of the evolution of American foreign policy from 1938 to the present. Ambrose also wrote bestsellers "Undaunted Courage" and "D-Day".

The Rise of the Global Imaginary

The Rise of the Global Imaginary
Author: Manfred B. Steger
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 318
Release: 2008-07-03
Genre: History
ISBN: 0199286930

Download The Rise of the Global Imaginary Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

A tour de force examination of the contemporary ideological landscape by one of the world's leading analysts of globalization.

Globalization and Poverty

Globalization and Poverty
Author: Ann Harrison
Publsiher: University of Chicago Press
Total Pages: 536
Release: 2007-11-01
Genre: Business & Economics
ISBN: 9780226318004

Download Globalization and Poverty Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

Over the past two decades, the percentage of the world’s population living on less than a dollar a day has been cut in half. How much of that improvement is because of—or in spite of—globalization? While anti-globalization activists mount loud critiques and the media report breathlessly on globalization’s perils and promises, economists have largely remained silent, in part because of an entrenched institutional divide between those who study poverty and those who study trade and finance. Globalization and Poverty bridges that gap, bringing together experts on both international trade and poverty to provide a detailed view of the effects of globalization on the poor in developing nations, answering such questions as: Do lower import tariffs improve the lives of the poor? Has increased financial integration led to more or less poverty? How have the poor fared during various currency crises? Does food aid hurt or help the poor? Poverty, the contributors show here, has been used as a popular and convenient catchphrase by parties on both sides of the globalization debate to further their respective arguments. Globalization and Poverty provides the more nuanced understanding necessary to move that debate beyond the slogans.

Rise to Globalism

Rise to Globalism
Author: Stephen E. Ambrose
Publsiher: Penguin Mass Market
Total Pages: 428
Release: 1993
Genre: United States
ISBN: UOM:39015029852327

Download Rise to Globalism Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

An overview of the evolution of American foreign policy from 1938 to the present, focusing on such events as World War II, the Cuban missile crisis, Vietnam, and the SALT treaties. The author examines such topics as the Iran-Contra scandal and free electio

Globalization A Very Short Introduction

Globalization  A Very Short Introduction
Author: Manfred B. Steger
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 176
Release: 2020-05-28
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 9780192589323

Download Globalization A Very Short Introduction Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

We live today in an interconnected world in which ordinary people can became instant online celebrities to fans thousands of miles away, in which religious leaders can influence millions globally, in which humans are altering the climate and environment, and in which complex social forces intersect across continents. This is globalization. In the fifth edition of his bestselling Very Short Introduction Manfred B. Steger considers the major dimensions of globalization: economic, political, cultural, ideological, and ecological. He looks at its causes and effects, and engages with the hotly contested question of whether globalization is, ultimately, a good or a bad thing. From climate change to the Ebola virus, Donald Trump to Twitter, trade wars to China's growing global profile, Steger explores today's unprecedented levels of planetary integration as well as the recent challenges posed by resurgent national populism. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.

Citizenship and Immigration

Citizenship and Immigration
Author: Christian Joppke
Publsiher: John Wiley & Sons
Total Pages: 224
Release: 2013-05-06
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 9780745658391

Download Citizenship and Immigration Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

This incisive book provides a succinct overview of the new academic field of citizenship and immigration, as well as presenting a fresh and original argument about changing citizenship in our contemporary human rights era. Instead of being nationally resilient or in “postnational” decline, citizenship in Western states has continued to evolve, converging on a liberal model of inclusive citizenship with diminished rights implications and increasingly universalistic identities. This convergence is demonstrated through a sustained comparison of developments in North America, Western Europe and Australia. Topics covered in the book include: recent trends in nationality laws; what ethnic diversity does to the welfare state; the decline of multiculturalism accompanied by the continuing rise of antidiscrimination policies; and the new state campaigns to “upgrade” citizenship in the post-2001 period. Sophisticated and informative, and written in a lively and accessible style, this book will appeal to upper-level students and scholars in sociology, political science, and immigration and citizenship studies.

Neo nationalism and Universities

Neo nationalism and Universities
Author: John Aubrey Douglass
Publsiher: JHU Press
Total Pages: 320
Release: 2021-09-07
Genre: Education
ISBN: 9781421441870

Download Neo nationalism and Universities Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

The rise of neo-nationalism is having a profound and troubling impact on leading national universities and the societies they serve. This is the first comparative study of how today's right-wing populist movements and authoritarian governments are threatening higher education. Universities have long been at the forefront of both national development and global integration. But the political and policy world in which they operate is undergoing a transition, one that is reflective of a significant change in domestic politics and international relations: a populist turn inward among a key group of nation-states, often led by demagogues, that includes China and Hong Kong, Turkey, Hungary, Russia, Brazil, the United Kingdom, and the United States. In many parts of the world, the COVID-19 pandemic provided an opportunity for populists and autocrats to further consolidate their power. Within right-wing political ecosystems, universities, in effect, offer the proverbial canary in the coal mine—a clear window into the extent of civil liberties and the political environment and trajectory of nation-states. In Neo-nationalism and Universities, John Aubrey Douglass provides the first significant examination of the rise of neo-nationalism and its impact on the missions, activities, behaviors, and productivity of leading national universities. Douglass presents a major comparative exploration of the role of national politics and norms in shaping the role of universities in nation-states—and vice versa. He also explores when universities are societal leaders or followers: When they are agents of social and economic change, or simply agents reinforcing and supporting an existing social and political order. In a series of case studies, Douglass and contributors examine troubling trends that threaten the societal role of universities, including attacks on civil liberties, free speech, and the validity of science; the firing and jailing of academics; anti-immigrant rhetoric; and restrictions on visas with consequences for the mobility of academic talent. The book also offers recommendations to preserve the autonomy and academic freedom of universities and their constituents. Neo-nationalism and Universities is written for a broad public readership interested and concerned about the rise of nationalist movements, illiberal democracies, and autocratic leaders. Contributors: José Augusto Guilhon Albuquerque, Elizabeth Balbachevsky, Thomas Brunotte, Igor Chirikov, Igor Fedyukin, Karin Fischer, Wilhelm Krull, Brendan O'Malley, Bryan E. Penprase, Marijk van der Wende

Tomorrow the World

Tomorrow  the World
Author: Stephen Wertheim
Publsiher: Harvard University Press
Total Pages: 224
Release: 2020-10-27
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780674248663

Download Tomorrow the World Book in PDF, Epub and Kindle

A new history explains how and why, as it prepared to enter World War II, the United States decided to lead the postwar world. For most of its history, the United States avoided making political and military commitments that would entangle it in European-style power politics. Then, suddenly, it conceived a new role for itself as the world’s armed superpower—and never looked back. In Tomorrow, the World, Stephen Wertheim traces America’s transformation to the crucible of World War II, especially in the months prior to the attack on Pearl Harbor. As the Nazis conquered France, the architects of the nation’s new foreign policy came to believe that the United States ought to achieve primacy in international affairs forevermore. Scholars have struggled to explain the decision to pursue global supremacy. Some deny that American elites made a willing choice, casting the United States as a reluctant power that sloughed off “isolationism” only after all potential competitors lay in ruins. Others contend that the United States had always coveted global dominance and realized its ambition at the first opportunity. Both views are wrong. As late as 1940, the small coterie of officials and experts who composed the U.S. foreign policy class either wanted British preeminence in global affairs to continue or hoped that no power would dominate. The war, however, swept away their assumptions, leading them to conclude that the United States should extend its form of law and order across the globe and back it at gunpoint. Wertheim argues that no one favored “isolationism”—a term introduced by advocates of armed supremacy in order to turn their own cause into the definition of a new “internationalism.” We now live, Wertheim warns, in the world that these men created. A sophisticated and impassioned narrative that questions the wisdom of U.S. supremacy, Tomorrow, the World reveals the intellectual path that brought us to today’s global entanglements and endless wars.