Smyrna September 1922

Smyrna  September 1922
Author: Lou Ureneck
Publsiher: HarperCollins
Total Pages: 528
Release: 2015-05-12
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780062259905

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The harrowing story of a Methodist Minister and a principled American naval officer who helped rescue more than 250,000 refugees during the genocide of Armenian and Greek Christians—a tale of bravery, morality, and politics, published to coincide with the genocide’s centennial. The year was 1922: World War I had just come to a close, the Ottoman Empire was in decline, and Asa Jennings, a YMCA worker from upstate New York, had just arrived in the quiet coastal city of Smyrna to teach sports to boys. Several hundred miles to the east in Turkey’s interior, tensions between Greeks and Turks had boiled over into deadly violence. Mustapha Kemal, now known as Ataturk, and his Muslim army soon advanced into Smyrna, a Christian city, where a half a million terrified Greek and Armenian refugees had fled in a desperate attempt to escape his troops. Turkish soldiers proceeded to burn the city and rape and kill countless Christian refugees. Unwilling to leave with the other American civilians and determined to get Armenians and Greeks out of the doomed city, Jennings worked tirelessly to feed and transport the thousands of people gathered at the city’s Quay. With the help of the brilliant naval officer and Kentucky gentleman Halsey Powell, and a handful of others, Jennings commandeered a fleet of unoccupied Greek ships and was able to evacuate a quarter million innocent people—an amazing humanitarian act that has been lost to history, until now. Before the horrible events in Turkey were complete, Jennings had helped rescue a million people. By turns harrowing and inspiring, The Great Fire uses eyewitness accounts, documents, and survivor narratives to bring this episode—extraordinary for its brutality as well as its heroism—to life.

Smyrna September 1922

Smyrna  September 1922
Author: Lou Ureneck
Publsiher: Ecco
Total Pages: 512
Release: 2016-04-26
Genre: History
ISBN: 006225989X

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The harrowing story of a Methodist Minister and a principled American naval officer who helped rescue more than 250,000 refugees during the genocide of Armenian and Greek Christians—a tale of bravery, morality, and politics, published to coincide with the genocide’s centennial. The year was 1922: World War I had just come to a close, the Ottoman Empire was in decline, and Asa Jennings, a YMCA worker from upstate New York, had just arrived in the quiet coastal city of Smyrna to teach sports to boys. Several hundred miles to the east in Turkey’s interior, tensions between Greeks and Turks had boiled over into deadly violence. Mustapha Kemal, now known as Ataturk, and his Muslim army soon advanced into Smyrna, a Christian city, where a half a million terrified Greek and Armenian refugees had fled in a desperate attempt to escape his troops. Turkish soldiers proceeded to burn the city and rape and kill countless Christian refugees. Unwilling to leave with the other American civilians and determined to get Armenians and Greeks out of the doomed city, Jennings worked tirelessly to feed and transport the thousands of people gathered at the city’s Quay. With the help of the brilliant naval officer and Kentucky gentleman Halsey Powell, and a handful of others, Jennings commandeered a fleet of unoccupied Greek ships and was able to evacuate a quarter million innocent people—an amazing humanitarian act that has been lost to history, until now. Before the horrible events in Turkey were complete, Jennings had helped rescue a million people. By turns harrowing and inspiring, The Great Fire uses eyewitness accounts, documents, and survivor narratives to bring this episode—extraordinary for its brutality as well as its heroism—to life.

Blue Ribbons Bitter Bread

Blue Ribbons Bitter Bread
Author: Susanna de Vries
Publsiher: Pirgos Press
Total Pages: 398
Release: 2018-10-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography
ISBN: 9781925281798

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This unforgettable story has become an Australian classic describing how an Australian bush girl saved the lives of 1,000 Polish and Jewish children in a daring escape from the Nazis. This updated edition contains an important eye-witness account of the burning of Smyrna (Izmir) causing a vast number of deaths. The author's father, a young British naval officer, saved hundreds of Greeks from the blaze that destroyed their beautiful city and many of them would be cared for by Joice Loch in a Greek refugee camp and later in the refugee village of Ouranoupolis, now a holiday resort. Joice Loch was an extraordinary Australian. She had the inspired courage that saved many hundreds of Jews and Poles in World War II, the compassion that made her a self-trained doctor to tens of thousands of refugees, the incredible grit that took her close to death in several theatres of war, and the dedication to truth and justice that shone forth in her own books and a lifetime of astonishing heroism. Born in a cyclone in 1887 on a Queensland sugar plantation she grew up in grinding poverty in Gippsland and emerged from years of unpaid drudgery by writing a children's book and freelance journalism. In 1918 she married Sydney Loch, author of a banned book on Gallipoli. After a dangerous time in Dublin during the Troubles, they escaped from possible IRA vengeance to work with the Quakers in Poland. There they rescued countless dispossessed people from disease and starvation and risked death themselves. In 1922 Joice and Sydney went to Greece to aid the 1,500,000 refugees fleeing Turkish persecution. Greece was to become their home. They lived in an ancient tower by the sea in the shadows of Athos, the Holy Mountain, and worked selflessly for decades to save victims of war, famine and disease. During World War II, Joice Loch was an agent for the Allies in Eastern Europe and pulled off a spectacular escape to snatch over a thousand Jews and Poles from death just before the Nazis invaded Bucharest, escorting them via Constantinople to Palestine. By the time she died in 1982 she had written ten books, saved many thousands of lives and was one of the world's most decorated women. At her funeral the Greek Orthodox Bishop of Oxford named her 'one of the most significant women of the twentieth century.' This classic Australian biography is a tribute to one of Australia's most heroic women, who always spoke with great fondness of Queensland as her birthplace. In 2006, a Loch Memorial Museum was opened in the tower by the sea in Ouranoupolis, a tribute to the Lochs and their humanitarian work.

The Thirty Year Genocide

The Thirty Year Genocide
Author: Benny Morris,Dror Ze’evi
Publsiher: Harvard University Press
Total Pages: 636
Release: 2019-04-24
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780674916456

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From 1894 to 1924 three waves of violence swept across Anatolia, targeting the region’s Christian minorities. Benny Morris and Dror Ze’evi’s impeccably researched account is the first to show that the three were actually part of a single, continuing, and intentional effort to wipe out Anatolia’s Christian population and create a pure Muslim nation.

Borders and Borderlands

Borders and Borderlands
Author: Richard Pine,Vera Konidari
Publsiher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
Total Pages: 300
Release: 2021-03-10
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines
ISBN: 9781527567313

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The crossing of borders and frontiers between political states and between languages and cultures continues to inhibit and bedevil the freedom of movement of both ideas and people. This book addresses the issues arising from problems of translation and communication, the understanding of identity in hyphenated cultures, the relationship between landscape and character, and the multiplex topic of gender transition. Literature as a key to identity in borderland situations is explored here, together with analyses of semiotics, narratives of madness and abjection. The volume also examines the contemporary refugee crisis through first-hand “Personal Witness” accounts of migration, and political, ethnic and religious divisions in Kosovo, Greece, Portugal and North America. Another section, gathering together historical and current “Poetry of Exile”, offers poets’ perspectives on identity and tradition in the context of loss, alienation, fear and displacement.

Not Even My Name

Not Even My Name
Author: Thea Halo
Publsiher: Macmillan
Total Pages: 321
Release: 2000
Genre: Genocide
ISBN: 0312262116

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Smyrna 1922

Smyrna 1922
Author: Marjorie Housepian Dobkin
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 275
Release: 1988
Genre: History
ISBN: UOM:39015013413367

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On one level Smyrna 1922 is a modern Greek tragedy replete with the elements of irony and horror. The Greeks, one of the victorious Allied powers during World War 1, were betrayed by their allies and their army driven into the sea at Smyrna by the forces of Mustapha Kemal, an insurgent leader to whom his former enemies had given considerable covert help. There followed an enactment of the week of orgy after the fall of Constantinople in 1453; pillage, rape and massacre culminating, in this instance, in the spectacular destruction by fire of Smyrna (now Izmir), considered an infidel city by the Turks because of its predominantly Greek character and population. Dobkin's study is a definitive work concerning a debacle deliberately soft pedalled and almost expunged from the memory of modern day man in the words of Henry Miller in The Colossus of Maroussi.

Portraits of Hope

Portraits of Hope
Author: Huberta v. Voss
Publsiher: Berghahn Books
Total Pages: 340
Release: 2007-06
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781845452575

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Elie Wiesel called the genocide of the Armenians during the First World War ‘the Holocaust before the Holocaust’. Around one and a half million Armenians - men, women and children – were slaughtered at the time of the First World War. This book outlines some of the historical facts and consequences of the massacres but sees it as its main objective to present the Armenians to the foreign reader, their history but also their lives and achievements in the present that finds most Armenians dispersed throughout the world. 3000 years after their appearance in history, 1700 years after adopting Christianity and almost 90 years after the greatest catastrophe in their history, these 50 ‘biographical sketches of intellectuals, artists, journalists, and others...produce a complicated kaleidoscope of a divided but lively people that is trying once again, to rediscover its ethnic coherence. Armenian civilization does not consist solely of stories about a far-off past, but also of traditions and a national conscience suggestive of a future that will transcend the present.’ [from the Preface]

The Blight of Asia

The Blight of Asia
Author: George Horton,James Watson Gerard
Publsiher: Taderon Press
Total Pages: 208
Release: 2003
Genre: History
ISBN: 1903656796

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Personal Names Hitler and the Holocaust

Personal Names  Hitler  and the Holocaust
Author: I. M. Nick
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield
Total Pages: 518
Release: 2019-05-13
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines
ISBN: 9781498525985

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During the Third Reich, in the name of national security, the Nazis introduced legislation to quickly and easily mark residents with Jewish heritage to expedite their isolation, deportation, and final extermination. Then as now, the tool used for this lethal demarcation was as innocuous as it was ubiquitous: personal names.

The Blight of Asia

The Blight of Asia
Author: George Horton
Publsiher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Total Pages: 134
Release: 2017-04-19
Genre: Electronic Book
ISBN: 1545455058

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The Blight of Asia contains first-hand accounts of the Christian massacres which took place in Turkey and Greece during the early 20th century. George Horton worked in the Diplomatic Corps of the United States, and was posted to Greece and the Ottoman Empire for most of his career as a diplomatic attache. Working across several offices in what is now Turkey and Greece, he witnessed the chaotic fall of the Ottoman government - a period in which great numbers of people were killed by Islamists for their ethnicity and their faith. The grim accounts of continuous, sustained persecution of Christian peoples in various cities and districts spares no detail. Horton felt repulsed by the often Medieval-toned barbarism and inhumanity of the killings; the 'Blight of Asia' is Horton's shorthand term for the horrors unleashed by the Ottoman Empire during its final years. Partly biographical, this memoir charts Horton's life in the different diplomatic offices. After introducing the book with historical mentions of earlier killings, the detailed main body of work - inclusive of sometimes horrifying eyewitness accounts dating from 1909 onward - is presented to the reader. Horton was catapulted to fame for authoring this book. His systematic method, which details the various massacres of Christians in Asia Minor and Greece during the early 20th century, is eloquent, civilized and composed in the face of terrible inhumanity. Perhaps the worst single event was the Great Fire of Smyrna in September 1922, wherein many thousands of people were immolated in the maelstrom. Some modern scholars, such as Biray Kolluoglu Kırlı and Peter M. Buzanski, have criticized what they perceive as Horton's anti-Turkey bias, noting his ideological opinions and the fact his wife was Greek. However, The Blight of Asia remains one of the most influential and important sources regarding these bloody episodes in Turkish and Greek history.

Ships of Mercy

Ships of Mercy
Author: Christos Papoutsy
Publsiher: Peter Randall Pub
Total Pages: 254
Release: 2008
Genre: Transportation
ISBN: UOM:39015073993183

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"Ships of Mercy" reveals the true heroes of Smyrna, forgotten by history. It is based on more than ten years of research by Christos Papoutsy, who traveled around the globe to document the rescue of hundreds of thousands of Greek refugees on the Smyrna quay in September 1922.

Paradise Lost

Paradise Lost
Author: Giles Milton
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 426
Release: 2008
Genre: Greco-Turkish War, 1921-1922
ISBN: IND:30000110567272

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A powerful tale of destruction, heroism and survival by the bestselling author of NATHANIEL'S NUTMEG.

Paradise Lost

Paradise Lost
Author: Giles Milton
Publsiher: Hodder
Total Pages: 448
Release: 2011-10-13
Genre: Fiction
ISBN: 9781444731798

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On Saturday 9th September, 1922, the victorious Turkish cavalry rode into Smyrna, the richest and most cosmopolitan city in the Ottoman Empire. What happened over the next two weeks must rank as one of the most compelling human dramas of the twentieth century. Almost two million people were caught up in a disaster of truly epic proportions. PARADISE LOST is told with the narrative verve that has made Giles Milton a bestselling historian. It unfolds through the memories of the survivors, many of them interviewed for the first time, and the eyewitness accounts of those who found themselves caught up in one of the greatest catastrophes of the modern age.

Smyrna s Ashes

Smyrna s Ashes
Author: Michelle Tusan
Publsiher: Univ of California Press
Total Pages: 268
Release: 2012-11-15
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780520289567

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Today the West tends to understand the Middle East primarily in terms of geopolitics: Islam, oil, and nuclear weapons. But in the nineteenth century it was imagined differently. The interplay of geography and politics found definition in a broader set of concerns that understood the region in terms of the moral, humanitarian, and religious commitments of the British empire. Smyrna’s Ashes reevaluates how this story of the “Eastern Question” shaped the cultural politics of geography, war, and genocide in the mapping of a larger Middle East after World War I.