Surviving the Oregon Trail 1852

Surviving the Oregon Trail  1852
Author: Weldon W. Rau,Mary Ann Boatman,Willis Boatman
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 244
Release: 2001
Genre: History
ISBN: UOM:39015050785990

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The 1852 overland migration was the largest on record, with numbers swelled by Oregon-bound settlers as well as hordes of gold-seekers destined for California. It also was a year in which cholera took a terrible toll in lives. Included here are firsthand accounts of this fateful year, including the words and thoughts of a young married couple, Mary Ann and Willis Boatman.

Surviving the Oregon Trail 1852

Surviving the Oregon Trail  1852
Author: Weldon W. Rau,Mary Ann Boatman,Willis Boatman
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 244
Release: 2001
Genre: History
ISBN: UVA:X004524269

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The 1852 overland migration was the largest on record, with numbers swelled by Oregon-bound settlers as well as hordes of gold-seekers destined for California. It also was a year in which cholera took a terrible toll in lives. Included here are firsthand accounts of this fateful year, including the words and thoughts of a young married couple, Mary Ann and Willis Boatman.

Surviving the Oregon Trail

Surviving the Oregon Trail
Author: Rebecca Stefoff
Publsiher: Enslow Publishing, LLC
Total Pages: 128
Release: 2012-01-01
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction
ISBN: 9781464604690

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In the nineteenth century, over half a million men, women and children traveled west on the Oregon Trail. Stretching two thousand miles from Independence Missouri, to the Pacific Northwest, the Oregon Trail was the longest overland route used in the westward expansion. Crossing mountains and deserts, fighting disease, short of both food and water, pioneers endured many hardships to follow the trail west with their hopes and dreams of seeking fortunes in the unsettled west. Author Rebecca Stefoff traces the roots of the Oregon and California Trails back to the seventeenth century, telling the stories of those who left the security and comfort of their homes, to endure months of hard travel in the hope of a new life.

The Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail
Author: Matt Doeden
Publsiher: Capstone
Total Pages: 112
Release: 2013-07
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction
ISBN: 9781476502540

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"Describes the journey on the Oregon Trail from three different historical perspectives"--Provided by publisher.

Best of Covered Wagon Women

Best of Covered Wagon Women
Author: Kenneth L. Holmes
Publsiher: University of Oklahoma Press
Total Pages: 304
Release: 2014-10-20
Genre: Biography & Autobiography
ISBN: 9780806182995

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The diaries and letters of women who braved the overland trails during the great nineteenth-century westward migration are treasured documents in the study of the American West. These eight firsthand accounts are among the best ever written. They were selected for the power with which they portray the hardship, adventure, and boundless love for friends and family that characterized the overland experience. Some were written with the skilled pens of educated women. Others bear the marks of crude cabin learning, with archaic and imaginative spelling and a simplicity of expression. All convey the profound effect the westward trek had on these women. For too long these diaries and letters were secreted away in attics and basements or collected dust on the shelves of manuscript collections across the country. Their publication gives us a fresh perspective on the pioneer experience.

Historical Dictionary of the American Frontier

Historical Dictionary of the American Frontier
Author: Jay H. Buckley,Brenden W. Rensink
Publsiher: Rowman & Littlefield
Total Pages: 356
Release: 2015-05-05
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781442249592

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The Historical Dictionary of the American Frontier covers early Euro-American exploration and development of frontiers in North America. The dictionary section has over 300 cross-referenced entries on explorers, adventurers, traders, religious orders, developers, and indigenous peoples.

Indians and Emigrants

Indians and Emigrants
Author: Michael L. Tate
Publsiher: University of Oklahoma Press
Total Pages: 352
Release: 2014-08-04
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780806182049

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In the first book to focus on relations between Indians and emigrants on the overland trails, Michael L. Tate shows that such encounters were far more often characterized by cooperation than by conflict. Having combed hundreds of unpublished sources and Indian oral traditions, Tate finds Indians and Anglo-Americans continuously trading goods and news with each other, and Indians providing various forms of assistance to overlanders. Tate admits that both sides normally followed their own best interests and ethical standards, which sometimes created distrust. But many acts of kindness by emigrants and by Indians can be attributed to simple human compassion. Not until the mid-1850s did Plains tribes begin to see their independence and cultural traditions threatened by the flood of white travelers. As buffalo herds dwindled and more Indians died from diseases brought by emigrants, violent clashes between wagon trains and Indians became more frequent, and the first Anglo-Indian wars erupted on the plains. Yet, even in the 1860s, Tate finds, friendly encounters were still the rule. Despite thousands of mutually beneficial exchanges between whites and Indians between 1840 and 1870, the image of Plains Indians as the overland pioneers’ worst enemies prevailed in American popular culture. In explaining the persistence of that stereotype, Tate seeks to dispel one of the West’s oldest cultural misunderstandings.

Covered Wagon Women 1852 The Oregon Trail

Covered Wagon Women  1852  The Oregon Trail
Author: Kenneth L. Holmes,David Duniway
Publsiher: U of Nebraska Press
Total Pages: 320
Release: 1995-01-01
Genre: History
ISBN: 0803272944

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V. 1. The women who traveled west in covered wagons during the 1840s speak through these letters and diaries. Here are the voices of Tamsen Donner and young Virginia Reed, members of the ill-fated Donner party; Patty Sessions, the Mormon midwife who delivered five babies on the trail between Omaha and Salt Lake City; Rachel Fisher, who buried both her husband and her little girl before reaching Oregon. Still others make themselves heard, starting out from different places and recording details along the way, from the mundane to the soul-shattering and spirit-lifting.

Abbey s Journey

Abbey s Journey
Author: Glida Bothwell
Publsiher: iUniverse
Total Pages: 308
Release: 2020-12-30
Genre: Fiction
ISBN: 9781663211675

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Abbey Green hates Seattle, rain, and him. With her life in shambles after a breakup and the loss of her job, it seems she has no other option but to return to her hometown of Boise, Idaho, to stay with her widowed mother. During her trip, when she is plagued by strange dreams, Abbey has no idea they are foretelling of what is to come. While visiting her childhood home and doing her best to deal with her mother’s declining mental capacity, Abbey uncovers a dusty trunk in the attic. Inside is a gold locket and an old handwritten diary that details a young woman’s journey from Kentucky to Oregon during 1852. A short time later, as Abbey holds the locket in her hand, she is suddenly thrust back in time where she joins a wagon train headed west on the Oregon Trail during the same time period. While on a journey filled with hardships, tragedy, and adversity, Abbey not only gains new relationships but also insight into her own path forward in life. In this historical novel, a modern-day woman travels back in time to join a wagon train on the Oregon Trail, finding insight into her twenty-first century life.

Treaties and Treachery

Treaties and Treachery
Author: Kurt R. Nelson
Publsiher: U of Nebraska Press
Total Pages: 304
Release: 2011-05-15
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780870045004

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Distributed by the University of Nebraska Press for Caxton Press The seven years from 1853 to 1859 are probably more important to the Pacific Northwest than any period of its recorded history. It was in the 1850s that officials began carving the Oregon Territory into the states. It was the period when most Native American tribes signed treaties that were supposed to protect their future. It was also when the natives of the region learned that no matter what the treaties promised, they would have little control over their destiny. So they fought a hopeless battle to preserve their way of life. Both settlers and Natives Americans believed they were God’s chosen people. With hindsight, we can see with clarity the injustices done. But neither side can claim purity of action. Atrocities were committed by both. For almost every major tribe of the Northwest, the 1850s marked the end of their way of life. This is the story of how cultures clashed. This is the story of one corner of our country, and how its history shapes its course today.

The Great Medicine Road Part 3

The Great Medicine Road  Part 3
Author: Michael L. Tate
Publsiher: University of Oklahoma Press
Total Pages: 312
Release: 2017-09-21
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780806160238

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In the years after the discovery of gold in California, thousands of fortune seekers made their way west, joining the greatest mass migration in American history. The gold fields were only one destination, as emigrants pushed across the Great Plains, Great Basin, and Oregon Territory in unprecedented numbers, following the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails to the verdant Willamette Valley or Mormon settlements in the Salt Lake Valley. “Seeing the Elephant” they often called the journey, referring to the wondrous sights and endless adventures met along the way. The firsthand accounts of those who made the trip between 1850 and 1855 that are collected in this third volume in a four-part series speak of wonders and adventures, but also of disaster and deprivation. Traversing the ever-changing landscape, these pioneers braved flooded rivers, endured cholera and hunger, and had encounters with Indians that were often friendly and sometimes troubled. Rich in detail and diverse in the experiences they relate, these letters, diary excerpts, recollections, and reports capture the voices of women and men of all ages and circumstances, hailing from states far and wide, and heading west in hope and desperation. Their words allow us to see the grit and glory of the American West as it once appeared to those who witnessed its transformation. Michael L. Tate begins the volume with an introduction to this middle phase of the trails’ history. A headnote and annotations for each document sketch the author’s background and reasons for undertaking the trip and correct and clarify information in the original manuscript. The extensive bibliography identifies sources and suggests further reading.

The Architects of America

The Architects of America
Author: Russell Blackwell
Publsiher: Algora Publishing
Total Pages: 312
Release: 2012
Genre: Architecture
ISBN: 9780875869087

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Did the Freemasons consciously affect the geographical growth of the USA in order to invest the layout of the states with a deeper, symbolic meaning? The narrative concentrates on the development of Masonic ritual during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuriesOCoespecially their description of the ''ideal building'' or TempleOCothe concurrent construction of America and the role Freemasons played in it, and the emergence of a simple but highly symbolic mathematical formula that recurs regularly throughout the history of the Republic. Maps and diagrams illustrate the surprising coherence of the theory."

The Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail
Author: Rinker Buck
Publsiher: Simon and Schuster
Total Pages: 464
Release: 2015-06-30
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781451659160

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In the bestselling tradition of Bill Bryson and Tony Horwitz, Rinker Buck's The Oregon Trail is a major work of participatory history: an epic account of traveling the 2,000-mile length of the Oregon Trail the old-fashioned way, in a covered wagon with a team of mules—which hasn't been done in a century—that also tells the rich history of the trail, the people who made the migration, and its significance to the country. Spanning 2,000 miles and traversing six states from Missouri to the Pacific Ocean, the Oregon Trail is the route that made America. In the fifteen years before the Civil War, when 400,000 pioneers used it to emigrate West—historians still regard this as the largest land migration of all time—the trail united the coasts, doubled the size of the country, and laid the groundwork for the railroads. The trail years also solidified the American character: our plucky determination in the face of adversity, our impetuous cycle of financial bubbles and busts, the fractious clash of ethnic populations competing for the same jobs and space. Today, amazingly, the trail is all but forgotten. Rinker Buck is no stranger to grand adventures. The New Yorker described his first travel narrative,Flight of Passage, as “a funny, cocky gem of a book,” and with The Oregon Trailhe seeks to bring the most important road in American history back to life. At once a majestic American journey, a significant work of history, and a personal saga reminiscent of bestsellers by Bill Bryson and Cheryl Strayed, the book tells the story of Buck's 2,000-mile expedition across the plains with tremendous humor and heart. He was accompanied by three cantankerous mules, his boisterous brother, Nick, and an “incurably filthy” Jack Russell terrier named Olive Oyl. Along the way, Buck dodges thunderstorms in Nebraska, chases his runaway mules across miles of Wyoming plains, scouts more than five hundred miles of nearly vanished trail on foot, crosses the Rockies, makes desperate fifty-mile forced marches for water, and repairs so many broken wheels and axels that he nearly reinvents the art of wagon travel itself. Apart from charting his own geographical and emotional adventure, Buck introduces readers to the evangelists, shysters, natives, trailblazers, and everyday dreamers who were among the first of the pioneers to make the journey west. With a rare narrative power, a refreshing candor about his own weakness and mistakes, and an extremely attractive obsession for history and travel,The Oregon Trail draws readers into the journey of a lifetime.

The Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail
Author: David Dary
Publsiher: Oxford University Press, USA
Total Pages: 414
Release: 2005
Genre: History
ISBN: 0195224000

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An in-depth history of the Oregon Trail follows the route used by fur traders, missionaries, and mountain men, offering colorful stories about the hardships and triumphs of the massive migration.

Jesse Applegate

Jesse Applegate
Author: Leta Lovelace Neiderheiser
Publsiher: Tate Publishing
Total Pages: 358
Release: 2011-02
Genre: Biography & Autobiography
ISBN: 9781617392290

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A history of Oregon without Jesse Applegate would be like Exodus without Moses. Like Moses, Jesse led pioneers through the wilderness across the Oregon Trail in 1843. Like Moses, he was a law-giver, and like Moses, when proper provocation occurred, he sometimes threw down the tablets.Jesse Applegate, A Dialogue with Destinygives a comprehensive historical perspective to the life of this interesting, complicated man who played a major role in the formation of Oregon. Throughout his amazing life, he led the 'cow column' of '43 west to Oregon, wrote the constitution of '45, played a major role in the solving of the Cayuse War, led the expedition to find a new southern route in'46, and fought to keep Oregon free of slavery. But perhaps even more important was the moral compass he provided for the emerging Oregon society. Through his letters to editors of newspapers and to prominent political figures, he provided comment, council, criticism, and loyal opposition to those in power. His opinions were sought by local, state and federal leaders, as well as the historians of the day.