Fearing the Worst

Fearing the Worst
Author: Samuel F. Wells Jr.
Publsiher: Columbia University Press
Total Pages: 586
Release: 2019-11-26
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780231549943

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After World War II, the escalating tensions of the Cold War shaped the international system. Fearing the Worst explains how the Korean War fundamentally changed postwar competition between the United States and the Soviet Union into a militarized confrontation that would last decades. Samuel F. Wells Jr. examines how military and political events interacted to escalate the conflict. Decisions made by the Truman administration in the first six months of the Korean War drove both superpowers to intensify their defense buildup. American leaders feared the worst-case scenario—that Stalin was prepared to start World War III—and raced to build up strategic arms, resulting in a struggle they did not seek out or intend. Their decisions stemmed from incomplete interpretations of Soviet and Chinese goals, especially the belief that China was a Kremlin puppet. Yet Stalin, Mao, and Kim Il-sung all had their own agendas, about which the United States lacked reliable intelligence. Drawing on newly available documents and memoirs—including previously restricted archives in Russia, China, and North Korea—Wells analyzes the key decision points that changed the course of the war. He also provides vivid profiles of the central actors as well as important but lesser known figures. Bringing together studies of military policy and diplomacy with the roles of technology, intelligence, and domestic politics in each of the principal nations, Fearing the Worst offers a new account of the Korean War and its lasting legacy.

The New Cold War

The New Cold War
Author: Mark Mackinnon
Publsiher: Vintage Canada
Total Pages: 336
Release: 2010-08-13
Genre: Political Science
ISBN: 9780307369925

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An intrepid investigation into the pro-democracy movements that have reshaped the Eastern bloc since 2000, reopening the Kremlin’s wounds from the Cold War. When the Berlin Wall fell in 1989 and the Soviet Union collapsed two years later, liberal democracy was supposed to fill the void left by Soviet communism. Poland and Czechoslovakia made the best of reforms, but the citizens of the “Evil Empire” itself saw little of the promised freedom, and more of the same old despots and corruption. Recently, a second wave of reforms–Serbia in 2000, Georgia in 2003 and Ukraine in 2004, as well as Kyrgyzstan’s regime change in 2005 – have proven almost as monumental as those in Berlin and Moscow. The people of the Eastern bloc, aided in no small part by Western money and advice, are again rising up and demanding an end to autocracy. And once more, the Kremlin is battling the White House every step of the way. Mark MacKinnon spent these years working in Moscow, and his view of the story and access to those involved remains unparalleled. With The New Cold War, he reveals the links between these democratic revolutions – and the idealistic American billionaire behind them–in a major investigation into the forces that are quietly reshaping the post- Soviet world.

Remembering the Cold War

Remembering the Cold War
Author: David Lowe,Tony Joel
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 260
Release: 2014-01-21
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781317912583

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Remembering the Cold War examines how, more than two decades since the collapse of the Soviet Union, Cold War legacies continue to play crucial roles in defining national identities and shaping international relations around the globe. Given the Cold War’s blurred definition – it has neither a widely accepted commencement date nor unanimous conclusion - what is to be remembered? This book illustrates that there is, in fact, a huge body of ‘remembrance,’ and that it is more pertinent to ask: what should be included and what can be overlooked? Over five sections, this richly illustrated volume considers case studies of Cold War remembering from different parts of the world, and engages with growing theorisation in the field of memory studies, specifically in relation to war. David Lowe and Tony Joel afford careful consideration to agencies that identify with being ‘victims’ of the Cold War. In addition, the concept of arenas of articulation, which envelops the myriad spaces in which the remembering, commemorating, memorialising, and even revising of Cold War history takes place, is given prominence.

The Cold War

The Cold War
Author: Odd Arne Westad
Publsiher: Basic Books
Total Pages: 720
Release: 2017-09-05
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780465093137

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The definitive history of the Cold War and its impact around the world We tend to think of the Cold War as a bounded conflict: a clash of two superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union, born out of the ashes of World War II and coming to a dramatic end with the collapse of the Soviet Union. But in this major new work, Bancroft Prize-winning scholar Odd Arne Westad argues that the Cold War must be understood as a global ideological confrontation, with early roots in the Industrial Revolution and ongoing repercussions around the world. In The Cold War, Westad offers a new perspective on a century when great power rivalry and ideological battle transformed every corner of our globe. From Soweto to Hollywood, Hanoi, and Hamburg, young men and women felt they were fighting for the future of the world. The Cold War may have begun on the perimeters of Europe, but it had its deepest reverberations in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East, where nearly every community had to choose sides. And these choices continue to define economies and regimes across the world. Today, many regions are plagued with environmental threats, social divides, and ethnic conflicts that stem from this era. Its ideologies influence China, Russia, and the United States; Iraq and Afghanistan have been destroyed by the faith in purely military solutions that emerged from the Cold War. Stunning in its breadth and revelatory in its perspective, this book expands our understanding of the Cold War both geographically and chronologically, and offers an engaging new history of how today's world was created.

Canada and the Cold War

Canada and the Cold War
Author: Reg Whitaker,Steve Hewitt
Publsiher: Lorimer
Total Pages: 192
Release: 2003-10-19
Genre: History
ISBN: STANFORD:36105121541945

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The Cold War was initiated in Canada in 1945 by the dramatic defection of Soviet cipher clerk, Igor Gouzenko. This event marked the start of what turned out to be more than four decades of muted conflict between the Soviet Union and the West. The story of Igor Gouzenko is only one of many tales of espionage and intrigue told in this lavishly illustrated history. Authors Reg Whitaker and Steve Hewitt offer anecdotes, analysis, and lively discussion of a subject that has seldom been written about before. The book is organized by decade with each decade introduced by a short contextualizing essay. Canada and the Cold War is an attractive gift book as well as a fascinating historical overview of a key period in Canadian history.

Shadow Cold War

Shadow Cold War
Author: Jeremy Friedman
Publsiher: UNC Press Books
Total Pages: 304
Release: 2015-10-15
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781469623771

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The conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War has long been understood in a global context, but Jeremy Friedman's Shadow Cold War delves deeper into the era to examine the competition between the Soviet Union and the People's Republic of China for the leadership of the world revolution. When a world of newly independent states emerged from decolonization desperately poor and politically disorganized, Moscow and Beijing turned their focus to attracting these new entities, setting the stage for Sino-Soviet competition. Based on archival research from ten countries, including new materials from Russia and China, many no longer accessible to researchers, this book examines how China sought to mobilize Asia, Africa, and Latin America to seize the revolutionary mantle from the Soviet Union. The Soviet Union adapted to win it back, transforming the nature of socialist revolution in the process. This groundbreaking book is the first to explore the significance of this second Cold War that China and the Soviet Union fought in the shadow of the capitalist-communist clash.

How We Forgot the Cold War

How We Forgot the Cold War
Author: Jon Wiener
Publsiher: Univ of California Press
Total Pages: 376
Release: 2012
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780520271418

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"Here's a book that would've split the sides of Thucydides. Wiener's magical mystery tour of Cold War museums is simultaneously hilarious and the best thing ever written on public history and its contestation." --Mike Davis, author of City of Quartz "Jon Wiener, an astute observer of how history is perceived by the general public, shows us how official efforts to shape popular memory of the Cold War have failed. His journey across America to visit exhibits, monuments, and other historical sites, demonstrates how quickly the Cold War has faded from popular consciousness. A fascinating and entertaining book." --Eric Foner, author of Reconstruction: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-1877 "In How We Forgot the Cold War, Jon Wiener shows how conservatives tried--and failed--to commemorate the Cold War as a noble victory over the global forces of tyranny, a 'good war' akin to World War II. Displaying splendid skills as a reporter in addition to his discerning eye as a scholar, this historian's travelogue convincingly shows how the right sought to extend its preferred policy of 'rollback' to the arena of public memory. In a country where historical memory has become an obsession, Wiener's ability to document the ambiguities and absences in these commemorations is an unusual accomplishment." --Rick Perlstein, author of Nixonland: The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America "In this terrific piece of scholarly journalism, Jon Wiener imaginatively combines scholarship on the Cold War, contemporary journalism, and his own observations of various sites commemorating the era to describe both what they contain and, just as importantly, what they do not. By interrogating the standard conservative brand of American triumphalism, Wiener offers an interpretation of the Cold War that emphasizes just how unnecessary the conflict was and how deleterious its aftereffects have really been."--Ellen Schrecker, author of Many Are The Crimes: McCarthyism in America

The Return of the Cold War

The Return of the Cold War
Author: J. L. Black,Michael Johns
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 290
Release: 2016-04-14
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9781317409533

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This book examines the crisis in Ukraine, tracing its development and analysing the factors which lie behind it. It discusses above all how the two sides have engaged in political posturing, accusations, escalating sanctions and further escalating threats, arguing that the ease with which both sides have reverted to a Cold War mentality demonstrates that the Cold War belief systems never really disappeared, and that the hopes raised in the aftermath of the collapse of the Soviet Union for a new era in East-West relations were misplaced. The book pays special attention to the often ignored origins of the crisis within Ukraine itself, and the permanent damage caused by the fact that Ukrainians are killing Ukrainians in the eastern parts of the country. It also assesses why Cold War belief systems have re-emerged so easily, and concludes by considering the likely long-term ramifications of the crisis, arguing that the deep-rooted lack of trust makes the possibility of compromise even harder than in the original Cold War.

The End of the Cold War

The End of the Cold War
Author: David Armstrong,Erik Goldstein
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 220
Release: 2013-11-05
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781135188375

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Giving an overview of the origins and history of the Cold War, this work considers whether the Cold War is truly over, and what the effects have been on Europe, and the former Soviet Union, as well as US foreign policy.

The Last Decade of the Cold War

The Last Decade of the Cold War
Author: Olav Njølstad
Publsiher: Psychology Press
Total Pages: 435
Release: 2004
Genre: History
ISBN: 0714685399

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The last decade of the Cold War witnessed the transformation of world politics with the collapse of one-party Communist rule in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. This book explains how it happened and why.

Reassessing Cold War Europe

Reassessing Cold War Europe
Author: Sari Autio-Sarasmo,Katalin Miklóssy
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 248
Release: 2010-10-18
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781136898341

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This book presents a comprehensive reassessment of Europe in the Cold War period, 1945-91. Contrary to popular belief, it shows that relations between East and West were based not only on confrontation and mutual distrust, but also on collaboration. The authors reveal that - despite opposing ideologies - there was in fact considerable interaction and exchange between different Eastern and Western actors (such states, enterprises, associations, organisations and individuals) irrespective of the Iron Curtain. This book challenges both the traditional understanding of the East-West juxtaposition and the relevancy of the Iron Curtain. Covering the full period, and taking into account a range of spheres including trade, scientific-technical co-operation, and cultural and social exchanges, it reveals how smaller countries and smaller actors in Europe were able to forge and implement their agendas within their own blocs. The books suggests that given these lower-level actors engaged in mutually beneficial cooperation, often running counter to the ambitions of the bloc-leaders, the rules of Cold War interaction were not, in fact, exclusively dictated by the superpowers.

The Cold War

The Cold War
Author: David Painter
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 144
Release: 2002-03-11
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781134742523

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The Cold War dominated international relations for forty-five years. It shaped the foreign policies of the United States and the Soviet Union and deeply affected their societies, domestic situations and their government institutions. Hardly any part of the world escaped its influence. David Painter provides a compact and analytical study that examines the origins, course, and end of the Cold War. His overview is global in perspective, with an emphasis on the Third World as well as the contested regions of Asia and Central America, and a strong consideration of economic issues. He includes discussion of: the global distribution of power the arms race the world economy. The Cold War gives a concise, original and interdisciplinary introduction to this international state of affairs, covering the years between 1945 and 1990.

The Cambridge History of the Cold War

The Cambridge History of the Cold War
Author: Melvyn P. Leffler,Odd Arne Westad
Publsiher: Cambridge University Press
Total Pages: 643
Release: 2010-03-25
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780521837194

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This volume examines the origins and early years of the Cold War in the first comprehensive historical reexamination of the period. A team of leading scholars shows how the conflict evolved from the geopolitical, ideological, economic and sociopolitical environments of the two world wars and interwar period.

Oceanographers and the Cold War

Oceanographers and the Cold War
Author: Jacob Darwin Hamblin
Publsiher: University of Washington Press
Total Pages: 368
Release: 2011-07-01
Genre: Science
ISBN: 0295801859

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Oceanographers and the Cold War is about patronage, politics, and the community of scientists. It is the first book to examine the study of the oceans during the Cold War era and explore the international focus of American oceanographers, taking into account the roles of the U.S. Navy, United States foreign policy, and scientists throughout the world. Jacob Hamblin demonstrates that to understand the history of American oceanography, one must consider its role in both conflict and cooperation with other nations. Paradoxically, American oceanography after World War II was enmeshed in the military-industrial complex while characterized by close international cooperation. The military dimension of marine science--with its involvement in submarine acoustics, fleet operations, and sea-launched nuclear missiles--coexisted with data exchange programs with the Soviet Union and global operations in seas without borders. From an uneasy cooperation with the Soviet bloc in the International Geophysical Year of 1957-58, to the NATO Science Committee in the late 1960s, which excluded the Soviet Union, to the U.S. Marine Sciences Council, which served as an important national link between scientists and the government, Oceanographers and the Cold War reveals the military and foreign policy goals served by U.S. government involvement in cooperative activities between scientists, such as joint cruises and expeditions. It demonstrates as well the extent to which oceanographers used international cooperation as a vehicle to pursue patronage from military, government, and commercial sponsors during the Cold War, as they sought support for their work by creating "disciples of marine science" wherever they could.

America s Cold War

America s Cold War
Author: Campbell Craig,Fredrik Logevall
Publsiher: Harvard University Press
Total Pages: 448
Release: 2012-03-05
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780674053670

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In a brilliant new interpretation, Campbell Craig and Fredrik Logevall reexamine the successes and failures of America’s Cold War. The United States dealt effectively with the threats of Soviet predominance in Europe and of nuclear war in the early years of the conflict. But by engineering this policy, American leaders successfully paved the way for domestic actors and institutions with a vested interest in the struggle’s continuation. Long after the USSR had been effectively contained, Washington continued to wage a virulent Cold War that entailed a massive arms buildup, wars in Korea and Vietnam, the support of repressive regimes and counterinsurgencies, and a pronounced militarization of American political culture.