The Landscape of History

The Landscape of History
Author: John Lewis Gaddis
Publsiher: Oxford University Press, USA
Total Pages: 192
Release: 2004
Genre: History
ISBN: 0195171578

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What is history and why should we study it? Is there such a thing as historical truth? Is history a science? One of the most accomplished historians at work today, John Lewis Gaddis, answers these and other questions in this short, witty, and humane book. The Landscape of History provides a searching look at the historian's craft, as well as a strong argument for why a historical consciousness should matter to us today. Gaddis points out that while the historical method is more sophisticated than most historians realize, it doesn't require unintelligible prose to explain. Like cartographers mapping landscapes, historians represent what they can never replicate. In doing so, they combine the techniques of artists, geologists, paleontologists, and evolutionary biologists. Their approaches parallel, in intriguing ways, the new sciences of chaos, complexity, and criticality. They don't much resemble what happens in the social sciences, where the pursuit of independent variables functioning with static systems seems increasingly divorced from the world as we know it. So who's really being scientific and who isn't? This question too is one Gaddis explores, in ways that are certain to spark interdisciplinary controversy. Written in the tradition of Marc Bloch and E.H. Carr, The Landscape of History is at once an engaging introduction to the historical method for beginners, a powerful reaffirmation of it for practitioners, a startling challenge to social scientists, and an effective skewering of post-modernist claims that we can't know anything at all about the past. It will be essential reading for anyone who reads, writes, teaches, or cares about history.

The Landscape of History

The Landscape of History
Author: John Lewis Gaddis
Publsiher: Oxford University Press
Total Pages: 208
Release: 2002-11-14
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780199741212

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What is history and why should we study it? Is there such a thing as historical truth? Is history a science? One of the most accomplished historians at work today, John Lewis Gaddis, answers these and other questions in this short, witty, and humane book. The Landscape of History provides a searching look at the historian's craft, as well as a strong argument for why a historical consciousness should matter to us today. Gaddis points out that while the historical method is more sophisticated than most historians realize, it doesn't require unintelligible prose to explain. Like cartographers mapping landscapes, historians represent what they can never replicate. In doing so, they combine the techniques of artists, geologists, paleontologists, and evolutionary biologists. Their approaches parallel, in intriguing ways, the new sciences of chaos, complexity, and criticality. They don't much resemble what happens in the social sciences, where the pursuit of independent variables functioning with static systems seems increasingly divorced from the world as we know it. So who's really being scientific and who isn't? This question too is one Gaddis explores, in ways that are certain to spark interdisciplinary controversy. Written in the tradition of Marc Bloch and E.H. Carr, The Landscape of History is at once an engaging introduction to the historical method for beginners, a powerful reaffirmation of it for practitioners, a startling challenge to social scientists, and an effective skewering of post-modernist claims that we can't know anything at all about the past. It will be essential reading for anyone who reads, writes, teaches, or cares about history.

The Landscape of History How Historians Map the Past

The Landscape of History How Historians Map the Past
Author: John Lewis Gaddis
Publsiher: Oxford University Press, USA
Total Pages: 208
Release: 2002-11-14
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780195066524

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What is history and why should we study it? Is there such a thing as historical truth? Is history a science? One of the most accomplished historians at work today, John Lewis Gaddis, answers these and other questions in this short, witty, and humane book. The Landscape of History provides a searching look at the historian's craft, as well as a strong argument for why a historical consciousness should matter to us today.Gaddis points out that while the historical method is more sophisticated than most historians realize, it doesn't require unintelligible prose to explain. Like cartographers mapping landscapes, historians represent what they can never replicate. In doing so, they combine the techniques of artists, geologists, paleontologists, and evolutionary biologists. Their approaches parallel, in intriguing ways, the new sciences of chaos, complexity, and criticality. They don't much resemble what happens in the social sciences, where the pursuit of independent variables functioning with static systems seems increasingly divorced from the world as we know it. So who's really being scientific and who isn't? This question too is one Gaddis explores, in ways that are certain to spark interdisciplinary controversy.Written in the tradition of Marc Bloch and E.H. Carr, The Landscape of History is at once an engaging introduction to the historical method for beginners, a powerful reaffirmation of it for practitioners, a startling challenge to social scientists, and an effective skewering of post-modernist claims that we can't know anything at all about the past. It will be essential reading for anyone who reads, writes, teaches, or cares about history.

History A Very Short Introduction

History  A Very Short Introduction
Author: John Arnold
Publsiher: Oxford Paperbacks
Total Pages: 134
Release: 2000-02-24
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780192853523

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Starting with an examination of how historians work, this "Very Short Introduction" aims to explore history in a general, pithy, and accessible manner, rather than to delve into specific periods.

History and Historians

History and Historians
Author: Mark T. Gilderhus
Publsiher: Pearson College Division
Total Pages: 140
Release: 2000
Genre: History
ISBN: 0130115827

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For undergraduate courses in historiography. Good supplemental text for American History or Western Civilization or similar survey courses. As a survey of historical thinking in the West from ancient times to the present, this accessible text focuses on historiography, philosophy of history, and historical methodology, introducing the main issues to beginning students with thorough and balanced discussions.

The Landscape of Historical Memory

The Landscape of Historical Memory
Author: Kirk A. Denton
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 272
Release: 2021
Genre: Collective memory
ISBN: 9888528904

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The Landscape of Historical Memory explores the place of museums and memorial culture in the contestation over historical memory in post-martial law Taiwan. The book is particularly oriented toward the role of politics--especially political parties--in the establishment, administration, architectural design, and historical narratives of museums. It is framed around the wrangling between the ""blue camp"" (the Nationalist Party, or KMT, and its supporters) and the ""green camp"" (Democratic Progressive Party, or DPP, and its supporters) over what facets of the past should be remembered and how.

Interpreting the Landscape

Interpreting the Landscape
Author: Michael Aston
Publsiher: Routledge
Total Pages: 168
Release: 2002-09-11
Genre: Social Science
ISBN: 9781134746309

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Most places in Britain have had a local history written about them. Up until this century these histories have addressed more parochial issues, such as the life of the manor, rather than explaining the features and changes in the landscape in a factual manner. Much of what is visible today in Britain's landscape is the result of a chain of social and natural processes, and can be interpreted through fieldwork as well as from old maps and documents. Michael Aston uses a wide range of source material to study the complex and dynamic history of the countryside, illustrating his points with aerial photographs, maps, plans and charts. He shows how to understand the surviving remains as well as offering his own explanations for how our landscape has evolved.

Imagining Serengeti

Imagining Serengeti
Author: Jan Bender Shetler
Publsiher: Ohio University Press
Total Pages: 392
Release: 2007-06-15
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780821442432

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Many students come to African history with a host of stereotypes that are not always easy to dislodge. One of the most common is that of Africa as safari grounds—as the land of expansive, unpopulated game reserves untouched by civilization and preserved in their original pristine state by the tireless efforts of contemporary conservationists. With prose that is elegant in its simplicity and analysis that is forceful and compelling, Jan Bender Shetler brings the landscape memory of the Serengeti to life. She demonstrates how the social identities of western Serengeti peoples are embedded in specific spaces and in their collective memories of those spaces. Using a new methodology to analyze precolonial oral traditions, Shetler identifies core spatial images and reevaluates them in their historical context through the use of archaeological, linguistic, ethnographic, ecological, and archival evidence. Imagining Serengeti is a lively environmental history that will ensure that we never look at images of the African landscape in quite the same way.

Historical Ground

Historical Ground
Author: John Dixon Hunt
Publsiher: Unknown
Total Pages: 165
Release: 2014
Genre: Architecture
ISBN: 041581412X

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This book investigates how contemporary landscape architecture invokes and displays the history of a site. These essays explore how designers do attach importance to how a location manifests its past. The process involves registering how geography, topography and climate determine design and how history discovered or even created for a site can structure its design and its reception. History can be evident, exploited, invented or feigned, it can be original or a new history which becomes part of how we view a place. Landscapes discussed in this book come from across Europe and the United States, highlighting the work of designers who have drawn from site history in their design, or have purposefully created their own historical account of the location. The author explores not just the historical past, but how new ground can be given a life and a future.

Reconstructing the Landscapes of Slavery

Reconstructing the Landscapes of Slavery
Author: Dale W. Tomich,Reinaldo Funes Monzote,Carlos Venegas Fornias,Rafael de Bivar Marquese
Publsiher: UNC Press Books
Total Pages: 176
Release: 2021-03-19
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781469663135

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Assessing a unique collection of more than eighty images, this innovative study of visual culture reveals the productive organization of plantation landscapes in the nineteenth-century Atlantic world. These landscapes—from cotton fields in the Lower Mississippi Valley to sugar plantations in western Cuba and coffee plantations in Brazil's Paraiba Valley—demonstrate how the restructuring of the capitalist world economy led to the formation of new zones of commodity production. By extension, these environments radically transformed slave labor and the role such labor played in the expansion of the global economy. Artists and mapmakers documented in surprising detail how the physical organization of the landscape itself made possible the increased exploitation of enslaved labor. Reading these images today, one sees how technologies combined with evolving conceptions of plantation management that reduced enslaved workers to black bodies. Planter control of enslaved people's lives and labor maximized the production of each crop in a calculated system of production. Nature, too, was affected: the massive increase in the scale of production and new systems of cultivation increased the land's output. Responding to world economic conditions, the replication of slave-based commodity production became integral to the creation of mass markets for cotton, sugar, and coffee, which remain at the center of contemporary life.

Petrolia

Petrolia
Author: Brian Black
Publsiher: Johns Hopkins University Press+ORM
Total Pages: 256
Release: 2003-04-01
Genre: History
ISBN: 9780801874659

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This award-winning history provides a fascinating look at the Civil War era oil boom in western Pennsylvania and its devastating impact on the region. In Petrolia, Brian Black offers a geographical and social history of a region that was not only the site of America’s first oil boom but was also the world’s largest oil producer between 1859 and 1873. Against the background of the growing demand for petroleum throughout and immediately following the Civil War, Black describes Oil Creek Valley’s descent into environmental hell. Known as “Petrolia,” the region of northwestern Pennsylvania charged the popular imagination with its nearly overnight transition from agriculture to industry. But so unrestrained were these early efforts at oil drilling, Black writes, that “the landscape came to be viewed only as an instrument out of which one could extract crude.” In a very short time, Petrolia was a ruined place—environmentally, economically, and to some extent even culturally. Black gives historical detail and analysis to account for this transformation. Winner of the Paul H. Giddens Prize in Oil History from Oil Heritage Region, Inc.

Most Unimaginably Strange

Most Unimaginably Strange
Author: Chris Caseldine
Publsiher: Reaktion Books
Total Pages: 324
Release: 2021-11-11
Genre: Science
ISBN: 9781789144734

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For all who yearn to travel to the home of the sagas, a beautifully illustrated companion to the terrain of Iceland—from puffins to ponies, glaciers and volcanoes to legendary trolls. Described by William Morris as “most unimaginably strange,” the landscape of Iceland has fascinated and inspired travelers, scientists, artists, and writers throughout history. This book provides a contemporary understanding of the landscape as a whole, not only its iconic glaciers and volcanoes, but also its deserts, canyons, plants, and animals. The book examines historic and modern scientific studies of the landscape and animals, as well as accounts of early visitors to the land. These were captivating people, some eccentric but most drawn to Iceland by an enthrallment with all things northern, a desire to experience the land of the sagas, or plain scientific and touristic curiosity. Featuring many spectacular illustrations, this is a fine exploration of a most singular landscape.

A Crooked Line

A Crooked Line
Author: Geoff Eley,Professor of History Geoff Eley
Publsiher: University of Michigan Press
Total Pages: 301
Release: 2005-10-24
Genre: History
ISBN: 0472069047

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A first-hand account of the genealogy of the discipline, and of the rise of a new era of social history, by one of the leading historians of a generation

Dangerous Games

Dangerous Games
Author: Margaret MacMillan
Publsiher: Modern Library
Total Pages: 208
Release: 2009-07-07
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781588367686

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Acclaimed historian Margaret MacMillan explores here the many ways in which history affects us all. She shows how a deeper engagement with history, both as individuals and in the sphere of public debate, can help us understand ourselves and the world better. But she also warns that history can be misused and lead to misunderstanding. History is used to justify religious movements and political campaigns alike. Dictators may suppress history because it undermines their ideas, agendas, or claims to absolute authority. Nationalists may tell false, one-sided, or misleading stories about the past. Political leaders might mobilize their people by telling lies. It is imperative that we have an understanding of the past and avoid these and other common traps in thinking to which many fall prey. This brilliantly reasoned work, alive with incident and figures both great and infamous, will compel us to examine history anew—and skillfully illuminates why it is important to treat the past with care.

Storied Ground

Storied Ground
Author: Paul Readman
Publsiher: Cambridge University Press
Total Pages: 135
Release: 2018-02-28
Genre: History
ISBN: 9781108424738

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The relationship between landscape and identity is explored to reveal how Englishness encompasses the urban and rural, and the north and south.